Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Invoking Student Voices as Third Space in the Exploration of National Identity

Abstract

This research was designed and conducted in order to 1) examine the life experience of secondary students as they negotiate government/civics course work in the development of a national identity and 2) better understand the impact of “pedagogical places” on students’ structured consciousness of a national identity. Within the framework of a social constructionist epistemology this qualitative investigation employed a hermeneutic phenomenological methodology complemented by the data collection tool of in-depth interviewing with the intent to understand the lived experiences of the students and the meaning students ascribe to a specific experience through storytelling.

Interestingly, “pedagogical places” as a Third Space for civic education manifested through student voice, appear to play a competitive role to the traditional civic education classroom in the students’ structured consciousness of a national identity. These findings 1) profoundly address the gap in the current body of civic education knowledge that underrepresents the voice of students and 2) suggest greater attention should be paid to the opportunity for student self-discovery and to the durability and trustworthiness of content material as vital in the civic education of students.

As the civic education of students continues to expand beyond the traditional social studies classroom to other “pedagogical places” for learning, to compete, civic-related curriculums must incorporate space for student agency, interest, and lived experiences.

Presentation Description

This investigation of the ways in which third spaces can mediate and complicate civic and social studies education is of great significance to social studies and teacher education from both a global and multicultural perspective. As a secondary classroom teacher for over 25 years and as a social studies methodology professor, I am committed to using my research as a vehicle to improve the quality of teacher preparation, and to usher in new pedagogical innovations.

Keywords

civic education curriculum, student voice, Third Space, pedagogical places

Location

Magnolia Room A

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 12th, 10:45 AM Jun 12th, 12:00 PM

Invoking Student Voices as Third Space in the Exploration of National Identity

Magnolia Room A

This research was designed and conducted in order to 1) examine the life experience of secondary students as they negotiate government/civics course work in the development of a national identity and 2) better understand the impact of “pedagogical places” on students’ structured consciousness of a national identity. Within the framework of a social constructionist epistemology this qualitative investigation employed a hermeneutic phenomenological methodology complemented by the data collection tool of in-depth interviewing with the intent to understand the lived experiences of the students and the meaning students ascribe to a specific experience through storytelling.

Interestingly, “pedagogical places” as a Third Space for civic education manifested through student voice, appear to play a competitive role to the traditional civic education classroom in the students’ structured consciousness of a national identity. These findings 1) profoundly address the gap in the current body of civic education knowledge that underrepresents the voice of students and 2) suggest greater attention should be paid to the opportunity for student self-discovery and to the durability and trustworthiness of content material as vital in the civic education of students.

As the civic education of students continues to expand beyond the traditional social studies classroom to other “pedagogical places” for learning, to compete, civic-related curriculums must incorporate space for student agency, interest, and lived experiences.