Title

Experiential Learning Exercises’ Effects on Students’ Attitudes Toward the Global Poor

Conference Tracks

Assessment and SoTL - Research

Abstract

Does participating in a budgeting exercise change students’ attitudes and empathy towards those living in poverty in the developing world? Experiential learning strives for an education that “first immerses learners in an experience and then encourages reflection about the experience to develop new skills, new attitudes, or new ways of thinking (Lewis and Williams, 1994, p. 5).” In short, the instructor designs activities to give learners firsthand personal experiences with the subject content, facilitates students to reflect on the experiences, and then encourages them to draw conclusions (Svinicki and Dixon, 1987, p. 143). In this paper we assess whether a budgeting exercise, drawing on students’ daily experiences and reflection on the difficulty of saving, affects their ability to understand the complex causes of global poverty and their empathy towards developing world citizens living in poverty.

Session Format

Research Brief and Reflection Panels

Location

Room 4

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Jan 25th, 4:15 PM Jan 25th, 5:15 PM

Experiential Learning Exercises’ Effects on Students’ Attitudes Toward the Global Poor

Room 4

Does participating in a budgeting exercise change students’ attitudes and empathy towards those living in poverty in the developing world? Experiential learning strives for an education that “first immerses learners in an experience and then encourages reflection about the experience to develop new skills, new attitudes, or new ways of thinking (Lewis and Williams, 1994, p. 5).” In short, the instructor designs activities to give learners firsthand personal experiences with the subject content, facilitates students to reflect on the experiences, and then encourages them to draw conclusions (Svinicki and Dixon, 1987, p. 143). In this paper we assess whether a budgeting exercise, drawing on students’ daily experiences and reflection on the difficulty of saving, affects their ability to understand the complex causes of global poverty and their empathy towards developing world citizens living in poverty.