Title

On Seeing and Being Pain: Corporeal Politics, Visual Cultures and Violence Against Women

Subject Area

Women and Gender Studies

Abstract

On Seeing and Being Pain: Corporeal Politics, Visual Cultures and Violence Against Women

This presentation will explore the ways in which Mexican and Central American visual and performance artists bring attention to feminicide and the violence against women that plagues the Northern Triangle Region and Mexico, as these countries share the unfortunate distinction of being some of the most dangerous places in the world for women. Artists such as Regina José Galindo (Guatemala), Rosa María Robles and Lorena Wolffer (México) use their work to confront their audiences with the violence against women, making visible the extreme conditions that women face in their everyday lives – from domestic violence to lack of access to reproductive health care to exploitation in the workplace to feminicide - and remembering the thousands of women who have lost their lives at the hands of gender violence. While often this violence is covered up and ignored and many victims of feminicide remain unidentified, their works often utilize their own bodies to make present and explicit the multiple and interconnected ways in which patriarchal oppression has silenced, exploited, and often attempt to erase women. These visual representations serve as powerful ways to denounce this violence and by the explicit use of the body, prompt the audience to consider ways in which violence, resistance and memory are gendered.

Brief Bio Note

Therese Tardio is Associate Teaching Professor of Hispanic Studies at Carnegie Mellon University and coordinator of the Hispanic Studies Program. Her current work focuses on gender violence against women, particularly in the Northern Triangle Region of Central America. She also conducts research on community engagement and critical pedagogy.

Keywords

gender, violence, Central America, Mexico

Location

Afternoon Session 1 (PARB 255)

Presentation Year

April 2019

Start Date

4-12-2019 2:35 PM

Embargo

11-26-2018

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Apr 12th, 2:35 PM

On Seeing and Being Pain: Corporeal Politics, Visual Cultures and Violence Against Women

Afternoon Session 1 (PARB 255)

On Seeing and Being Pain: Corporeal Politics, Visual Cultures and Violence Against Women

This presentation will explore the ways in which Mexican and Central American visual and performance artists bring attention to feminicide and the violence against women that plagues the Northern Triangle Region and Mexico, as these countries share the unfortunate distinction of being some of the most dangerous places in the world for women. Artists such as Regina José Galindo (Guatemala), Rosa María Robles and Lorena Wolffer (México) use their work to confront their audiences with the violence against women, making visible the extreme conditions that women face in their everyday lives – from domestic violence to lack of access to reproductive health care to exploitation in the workplace to feminicide - and remembering the thousands of women who have lost their lives at the hands of gender violence. While often this violence is covered up and ignored and many victims of feminicide remain unidentified, their works often utilize their own bodies to make present and explicit the multiple and interconnected ways in which patriarchal oppression has silenced, exploited, and often attempt to erase women. These visual representations serve as powerful ways to denounce this violence and by the explicit use of the body, prompt the audience to consider ways in which violence, resistance and memory are gendered.