Subject Area

Foreign Language Pedagogy

Abstract

This presentation examines some theories of learning at the tertiary level of education, and tests them in a research activity involving games and learning/knowledge. Two Intermediate Spanish classes are engaged in preliminary research to measure the effectiveness of a simple game (hangman) and technology (Responseware/clickers) as practice and review tools versus traditional methods; in formative assessment.

The presentation will consist of reporting on the Quantitative results focusing on the impact of using games in learning on students in the digital age. Student attitudes based on a qualitative survey administered to the students involved will be included in the report.

Both the qualitative and quantitative results will be interpreted in light of Astin’s theory on Student Involvement, a developmental theory for higher education. We also analyze the results as they reflect on some traditional pedagogical theories of learning such as the Subject Matter or Content theory, the Resource theory or the Individualized or Eclectic theory.

Brief Bio Note

Bio in 50-80 words

Dr. Arthur has a multi-disciplinary educational background in languages, international business and international affairs and development. Dr. Arthur holds a bachelor’s degree in French and Spanish, with a minor in English, a master’s degree in Spanish, a second master’s in Business Administration, and a doctorate in International Affairs and development (PhD).

Her diversified experiences derive from her love of teaching and languages. Besides a position as a tri-lingual secretary (Spanish/French/English) at the Spanish Embassy in Ghana, her teaching career spans decades, age groups, and geographical divides.

Keywords

Gaming, Technology, Digital natives, Learning theories, Digital immigrants, Generation Y

Location

Coastal Georgia Center

Presentation Year

2016

Start Date

4-8-2016 3:50 PM

End Date

4-8-2016 4:30 PM

Embargo

11-12-2015

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

 
Apr 8th, 3:50 PM Apr 8th, 4:30 PM

Technology, Games and Learning in an Intermediate Spanish Class

Coastal Georgia Center

This presentation examines some theories of learning at the tertiary level of education, and tests them in a research activity involving games and learning/knowledge. Two Intermediate Spanish classes are engaged in preliminary research to measure the effectiveness of a simple game (hangman) and technology (Responseware/clickers) as practice and review tools versus traditional methods; in formative assessment.

The presentation will consist of reporting on the Quantitative results focusing on the impact of using games in learning on students in the digital age. Student attitudes based on a qualitative survey administered to the students involved will be included in the report.

Both the qualitative and quantitative results will be interpreted in light of Astin’s theory on Student Involvement, a developmental theory for higher education. We also analyze the results as they reflect on some traditional pedagogical theories of learning such as the Subject Matter or Content theory, the Resource theory or the Individualized or Eclectic theory.