Title

Grammar in the 21st Century: Theory and Practice

Subject Area

Language & Technology

Abstract

Abstract:

This session discusses the theory and practice of effectively teaching grammar in classroom and tutorial settings by defining five types of grammar and introducing six tenets of grammar instruction. Teachers and tutors who better understand grammar theory and operational grammar instruction productively work with students’ acquisition of standard dialect, fostering effective academic communication.

This presentation will be guided by the following plan:

  • Defining Grammar
  • The Grammar “Problem” and the Myth of Transience
  • Misinformed Solutions
  • Dispelling the Myth and Research in Grammar Instruction
  • Effective Tutoring Strategies

The presenter will define five types of grammar: language acquisition, linguistic, etiquette, school-based and contextual (Hartwell and Williams). These definitions provide language through which to discuss grammar in specific rather than general terms.

Research in the teaching of grammar follows six main tenets (Hartwell, Williams, Shaughnessy, Rose). First, grammar is a learned behavior, not a performance skill. Second, grammar acquisition is part of the whole learning process, not a skill to be developed prior to learning. Third, students learn writing and speaking conventions the same way speech is acquired—by practice and over time. Fourth, the place to teach and learn grammar is in the context of usage. Fifth, students learn grammar usage by writing for an audience who can discuss disciplinary convention issues during the writing process. And sixth, no one ever “masters” grammar usage once and for all.

Teachers and tutors who better understand effective grammar instruction productively work with students’ acquisition of standard dialect, fostering effective communication in an academic setting.

Brief Bio Note

Diana Calhoun Bell is an associate professor specializing in rhetoric and composition and composition pedagogy at The University of Alabama in Huntsville. She has authored numerous articles and books on pedagogy, theory, feminism, technology, and writing/learning centers. She also served a term as editor of the Journal of College Reading and Learning, serves on the advisory boards of two major academic journals, and reviews textbooks and other classroom materials for several major publishing companies.

Keywords

Writing, Pedagogy, Grammar, Teaching, Revision

Location

Room 218

Presentation Year

2015

Start Date

3-27-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

3-27-2015 2:45 PM

Embargo

5-23-2017

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Mar 27th, 1:30 PM Mar 27th, 2:45 PM

Grammar in the 21st Century: Theory and Practice

Room 218

Abstract:

This session discusses the theory and practice of effectively teaching grammar in classroom and tutorial settings by defining five types of grammar and introducing six tenets of grammar instruction. Teachers and tutors who better understand grammar theory and operational grammar instruction productively work with students’ acquisition of standard dialect, fostering effective academic communication.

This presentation will be guided by the following plan:

  • Defining Grammar
  • The Grammar “Problem” and the Myth of Transience
  • Misinformed Solutions
  • Dispelling the Myth and Research in Grammar Instruction
  • Effective Tutoring Strategies

The presenter will define five types of grammar: language acquisition, linguistic, etiquette, school-based and contextual (Hartwell and Williams). These definitions provide language through which to discuss grammar in specific rather than general terms.

Research in the teaching of grammar follows six main tenets (Hartwell, Williams, Shaughnessy, Rose). First, grammar is a learned behavior, not a performance skill. Second, grammar acquisition is part of the whole learning process, not a skill to be developed prior to learning. Third, students learn writing and speaking conventions the same way speech is acquired—by practice and over time. Fourth, the place to teach and learn grammar is in the context of usage. Fifth, students learn grammar usage by writing for an audience who can discuss disciplinary convention issues during the writing process. And sixth, no one ever “masters” grammar usage once and for all.

Teachers and tutors who better understand effective grammar instruction productively work with students’ acquisition of standard dialect, fostering effective communication in an academic setting.