Title

A Study of Politeness, Gender, and Moroccan Women's Speech Strategies

Subject Area

Arabic and Islamic Studies

Abstract

The aim of my paper is to examine the phenomenon of politeness as a system of interpersonal relations designed to organize human interaction. I will focus on a critical review of the literature concerning linguistic politeness, arguing that universal definition of this phenomenon that would apply to all societies has not been reached, despite tentative cultural agreements on codes of behavior. I pay significant attention to Brown and Levinson's model and criticism of it. I include a discussion of the different strategies of politeness and in doing so, I cast light on how and why men and women, in most part of the world, differ from each other vis-a-vis language use. Lastly, I examine the intersection of language, gender, and politeness in Morocco. In doing so, I take into accounts the affect of the cultural factors of religion, geography, history, traditions, and orality.

Brief Bio Note

Mr. Youssef Salhi is a Lecturer of Arabic. He received his BA in Sociolinguistics from Hassan II University in Casablanca, Morocco, and his MA in Humanities with a concentration in Linguistics from the University of Louisville in Kentucky. Prior to arriving at GSU, Mr. Salhi held full-time positions at Eckerd College and at the University of Tampa. Mr. Youssef Salhi‘s areas of interest range from Arabic Language and Literature, Language and Gender, Code Switching, and Comparative Literature.

Keywords

Arabic, Reading, Spelling

Location

Room 210

Presentation Year

2015

Start Date

3-26-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

3-26-2015 11:45 AM

Embargo

5-23-2017

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Mar 26th, 10:30 AM Mar 26th, 11:45 AM

A Study of Politeness, Gender, and Moroccan Women's Speech Strategies

Room 210

The aim of my paper is to examine the phenomenon of politeness as a system of interpersonal relations designed to organize human interaction. I will focus on a critical review of the literature concerning linguistic politeness, arguing that universal definition of this phenomenon that would apply to all societies has not been reached, despite tentative cultural agreements on codes of behavior. I pay significant attention to Brown and Levinson's model and criticism of it. I include a discussion of the different strategies of politeness and in doing so, I cast light on how and why men and women, in most part of the world, differ from each other vis-a-vis language use. Lastly, I examine the intersection of language, gender, and politeness in Morocco. In doing so, I take into accounts the affect of the cultural factors of religion, geography, history, traditions, and orality.