Title

Redesigning Foreign Language Education for Strategic Positioning in the Preparation of Twenty-First Century Global Citizens

Subject Area

Foreign Language Pedagogy

Abstract

The 2007 MLA report emphasizes the necessity to transform the collegiate foreign language curriculum, if it is to remain relevant. Indeed, in a highly competitive world and extremely dynamic global economy, fuelled by the digital revolution and mass migration, it has become imperative to undertake curricular transformations that will make foreign language education more relevant to the intellectual, personal, and professional needs of contemporary global citizens. Beyond the traditional linguistic and literary focus, foreign language instruction must explore all available resources, including new content, pedagogical innovations, and technology, in order to stay afloat.

To this effect, this paper will examine the challenges and opportunities facing collegiate foreign language study in a globalized twenty-first century using the following research questions:

  1. How can curricular transformations in collegiate foreign language education enhance learning experiences and prepare students for success in today’s global workplace?
  2. How can an enriched foreign language curriculum strengthen the language departments?
  3. What types of interdisciplinary collaborations can be established between the language departments and other departments to provide curricular innovation?

In order to meet the changing needs of twenty-first century (global) learners, the paper argues that foreign language courses must connect with disciplines such as Business Studies, Public Health, Environmental Sustainability, technology, etc. and be complemented with field work, field trips, workshops, and cultural events. Such curricular innovations would provide foreign language learners the means to understand geo-political, social, economic, and technological issues related to globalization.

Brief Bio Note

Dr. Philip A. Ojo is the Kathy and Lawrence Ashe Associate Professor of French & Francophone Studies

at Agnes Scott College. His research interests include Francophone African and Caribbean literatures, and African popular culture. He has published on contemporary Beninese literature, Jacques Roumain, Maryse Condé, Sony Labou Tansi, Sembène Ousmane, Jean-Marie Teno, Alpha Blondy, Gangbé Brass Band, and Ramonu Sanusi. He is currently working on a project on identity expressions in Francophone African popular culture as a potential tool for social criticism and change.

Keywords

Collegiate, Foreign language, Redesigning, Curricular transformations, Global citizens, Pedagogical innovations, Learning experiences, Interdisciplinary

Location

Room 217

Presentation Year

2015

Start Date

3-26-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

3-26-2015 2:45 PM

Embargo

5-23-2017

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Mar 26th, 1:30 PM Mar 26th, 2:45 PM

Redesigning Foreign Language Education for Strategic Positioning in the Preparation of Twenty-First Century Global Citizens

Room 217

The 2007 MLA report emphasizes the necessity to transform the collegiate foreign language curriculum, if it is to remain relevant. Indeed, in a highly competitive world and extremely dynamic global economy, fuelled by the digital revolution and mass migration, it has become imperative to undertake curricular transformations that will make foreign language education more relevant to the intellectual, personal, and professional needs of contemporary global citizens. Beyond the traditional linguistic and literary focus, foreign language instruction must explore all available resources, including new content, pedagogical innovations, and technology, in order to stay afloat.

To this effect, this paper will examine the challenges and opportunities facing collegiate foreign language study in a globalized twenty-first century using the following research questions:

  1. How can curricular transformations in collegiate foreign language education enhance learning experiences and prepare students for success in today’s global workplace?
  2. How can an enriched foreign language curriculum strengthen the language departments?
  3. What types of interdisciplinary collaborations can be established between the language departments and other departments to provide curricular innovation?

In order to meet the changing needs of twenty-first century (global) learners, the paper argues that foreign language courses must connect with disciplines such as Business Studies, Public Health, Environmental Sustainability, technology, etc. and be complemented with field work, field trips, workshops, and cultural events. Such curricular innovations would provide foreign language learners the means to understand geo-political, social, economic, and technological issues related to globalization.