Presentation Title

Black Students' Perceptions of Diversity and Inclusion at Predominantly White Institutions

Location

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences (CBSS)

Session Format

Oral Presentation

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Dr. Kristina Patterson, Faculty Advisor

Abstract

This research is motivated by the gap in Black students’ retention rates and postsecondary educational attainment as compared to their white peers at Predominantly White Institutions. Current research shows that Black students may feel out of place due to the racial climates at Predominantly White Institutions, which affects the overall success of Black students (Xu and Webber, 2018; Park, 2012; Harper and Quaye, 2007; Pike and Kuh, 2006). We aim to identify campus practices which predict feelings of inclusion, gauge the racial climate of Predominantly White institutions, and examine the relationship between feelings of inclusion and measures of student success. We use a mixed methods approach, conducting focus groups with Black undergraduate students attending Predominantly White Institutions to identify inclusive practices. Results from analysis will inform the creation of a survey to examine racial climate, and quantitative analysis will examine the relationship between feelings of inclusion and retention and graduation rates for Black students. The research is ongoing, but we expect to find a positive association between perceptions of inclusion and educational outcomes for Black students. We hope universities will utilize our findings to inform practices to improve educational outcomes for Black students at PWI’s.

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Creative Commons License
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Presentation (Open Access)

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Black Students' Perceptions of Diversity and Inclusion at Predominantly White Institutions

College of Behavioral and Social Sciences (CBSS)

This research is motivated by the gap in Black students’ retention rates and postsecondary educational attainment as compared to their white peers at Predominantly White Institutions. Current research shows that Black students may feel out of place due to the racial climates at Predominantly White Institutions, which affects the overall success of Black students (Xu and Webber, 2018; Park, 2012; Harper and Quaye, 2007; Pike and Kuh, 2006). We aim to identify campus practices which predict feelings of inclusion, gauge the racial climate of Predominantly White institutions, and examine the relationship between feelings of inclusion and measures of student success. We use a mixed methods approach, conducting focus groups with Black undergraduate students attending Predominantly White Institutions to identify inclusive practices. Results from analysis will inform the creation of a survey to examine racial climate, and quantitative analysis will examine the relationship between feelings of inclusion and retention and graduation rates for Black students. The research is ongoing, but we expect to find a positive association between perceptions of inclusion and educational outcomes for Black students. We hope universities will utilize our findings to inform practices to improve educational outcomes for Black students at PWI’s.