Presentation Title

Combustion, Noise, and Vibrations of a Bio-fueled IDI Engine

Location

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Engineering and Material Sciences - Mechanical

Abstract

In this study, an indirect injection engine (IDI) was run at 2400 rpm and 5.7 bar IMEP (indicated mean effective pressure) with C50 (50% ULSD#2 and Carinata biodiesel blend by mass). Conventional diesel (ULSD#2) was used as a baseline for comparison of the combustion, sound, and vibrations analysis. Carinata was investigated as it is a relatively new biodiesel source that has been introduced to the United States; as a non-edible feedstock, it could potentially benefit the societal and industrial infrastructure. Carinata was transesterified using a methanol and sodium hydroxide catalyst; the biodiesel quality was determined by determining the total methanol and glycerol content of the produced batch. Before engine operation, both ULSD#2 and C50 were tested for property validation of viscosity, vaporization, lower heating value, and spray diameter distribution. Data measurements were then collected for the engine cycles with a high speed data acquisition system at 10 second intervals using diagnostic speed and temperature readouts, pressure piezoelectric transducers in the separate and main combustion chambers, a 2000 ppr rotary encoder, a multi-field microphone and a triaxial accelerometer. Burn rate analysis was performed in order to identify trends in ignition delay, combustion duration, and maximum heat transfer in the cylinder. Combustion characteristics were similar given the triple vortex swirl found in the engine’s separate combustion chamber. FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) and CPB (Constant Percentage Bandwidth) methods were employed with Bruel & Kjaer’s PULSE for data analysis and post processing in angle and frequency domain. Correlations were found based on operating speed, piston normal force on the cylinder liner, and intake and exhaust valve timing. Noise and vibrations pertinent to C50 were similar to ULSD#2 which was found advantageous given that C50 produced less nitrogen oxides emissions and had a lower ringing intensity due to a smoother pressure curve. The mechanical and thermal efficiencies were sustained with both fuels which confirmed viable usage of biodiesel in an IDI engine.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

4-16-2016 4:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 2:45 PM Apr 16th, 4:00 PM

Combustion, Noise, and Vibrations of a Bio-fueled IDI Engine

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

In this study, an indirect injection engine (IDI) was run at 2400 rpm and 5.7 bar IMEP (indicated mean effective pressure) with C50 (50% ULSD#2 and Carinata biodiesel blend by mass). Conventional diesel (ULSD#2) was used as a baseline for comparison of the combustion, sound, and vibrations analysis. Carinata was investigated as it is a relatively new biodiesel source that has been introduced to the United States; as a non-edible feedstock, it could potentially benefit the societal and industrial infrastructure. Carinata was transesterified using a methanol and sodium hydroxide catalyst; the biodiesel quality was determined by determining the total methanol and glycerol content of the produced batch. Before engine operation, both ULSD#2 and C50 were tested for property validation of viscosity, vaporization, lower heating value, and spray diameter distribution. Data measurements were then collected for the engine cycles with a high speed data acquisition system at 10 second intervals using diagnostic speed and temperature readouts, pressure piezoelectric transducers in the separate and main combustion chambers, a 2000 ppr rotary encoder, a multi-field microphone and a triaxial accelerometer. Burn rate analysis was performed in order to identify trends in ignition delay, combustion duration, and maximum heat transfer in the cylinder. Combustion characteristics were similar given the triple vortex swirl found in the engine’s separate combustion chamber. FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) and CPB (Constant Percentage Bandwidth) methods were employed with Bruel & Kjaer’s PULSE for data analysis and post processing in angle and frequency domain. Correlations were found based on operating speed, piston normal force on the cylinder liner, and intake and exhaust valve timing. Noise and vibrations pertinent to C50 were similar to ULSD#2 which was found advantageous given that C50 produced less nitrogen oxides emissions and had a lower ringing intensity due to a smoother pressure curve. The mechanical and thermal efficiencies were sustained with both fuels which confirmed viable usage of biodiesel in an IDI engine.