Location

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Public Health & Well Being - Epidemiologic Research

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Carmen H. Duke (Georgia Southern University)

Jazmin A. Williamson (Georgia Southern University)

Kathryn C. Finch (Georgia Southern University)

Kelly Sullivan (Georgia Southern University)

Abstract

The National Sleep Foundation recommends an average sleep time duration of 7-9 hours per day for adults aged 18-64 years old. Unfortunately, women are prone to encounter sleep disruptions during pregnancy that can prevent them from the recommended amount of sleep. Poor sleep during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for birth complications, including low birth weight and stillbirth. Studies have found that sleeping less and poor sleep quality is associated with lower consumption of fruits and vegetables and good sleep quality/adequate sleep is associated with increased fruit and vegetable consumption. The objective of this study was to determine the association between fruit and vegetable consumption with overall sleep duration among pregnant women. Data from the 2011 and 2012 Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used for this study. All women (n=2,951) of childbearing age (18-44 years) who were pregnant and responded to all fruit and vegetable consumption and sleep duration questions were included. Covariates included age, race, education level, exercise, and marital status. Data were analyzed using linear regression. Total daily fruit and vegetable consumption was not found to be associated with sleep duration among pregnant women, controlling for confounders [ë_= -0.03, (-0.07, 0.002)]. Orange and green vegetable consumption were both found to be inversely associated with sleep duration [ë_= -0.19, (-0.38, -0.01) and ë_= -0.20, (-0.33, -0.08) respectively]. An income level of $35,000 or higher was significantly associated with sleep in the total daily fruit and vegetable consumption model [ë_= 0.32 (0.16, 0.49)] when compared to the lower income group. Women who exercised within the past 30 days received approximately 20 minutes of additional sleep compared to those who did not [ë_= 0.32 (0.16, 0.49)]. Age and employment status were found to be significantly associated with sleep duration. Sleep duration in pregnant women was associated with exercise, but not with fruit and vegetable consumption. More descriptive data regarding exercise, diet, sleep quantity, sleep quality and family status may reveal a greater association with sleep duration than observed. Future research should include additional comorbidities such as gestational diabetes, family medical history, Category C sleep aids and other medications as potential confounders.

Keywords

Georgia Southern University, Research Symposium, Fruits, Vegetables, Consumption, Sleep quantity, Pregnant women

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-16-2016 12:00 PM

Included in

Epidemiology Commons

Share

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:45 AM Apr 16th, 12:00 PM

Association Between Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Sleep Quantity in Pregnant Women

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

The National Sleep Foundation recommends an average sleep time duration of 7-9 hours per day for adults aged 18-64 years old. Unfortunately, women are prone to encounter sleep disruptions during pregnancy that can prevent them from the recommended amount of sleep. Poor sleep during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for birth complications, including low birth weight and stillbirth. Studies have found that sleeping less and poor sleep quality is associated with lower consumption of fruits and vegetables and good sleep quality/adequate sleep is associated with increased fruit and vegetable consumption. The objective of this study was to determine the association between fruit and vegetable consumption with overall sleep duration among pregnant women. Data from the 2011 and 2012 Behavioral Risk Factors Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used for this study. All women (n=2,951) of childbearing age (18-44 years) who were pregnant and responded to all fruit and vegetable consumption and sleep duration questions were included. Covariates included age, race, education level, exercise, and marital status. Data were analyzed using linear regression. Total daily fruit and vegetable consumption was not found to be associated with sleep duration among pregnant women, controlling for confounders [ë_= -0.03, (-0.07, 0.002)]. Orange and green vegetable consumption were both found to be inversely associated with sleep duration [ë_= -0.19, (-0.38, -0.01) and ë_= -0.20, (-0.33, -0.08) respectively]. An income level of $35,000 or higher was significantly associated with sleep in the total daily fruit and vegetable consumption model [ë_= 0.32 (0.16, 0.49)] when compared to the lower income group. Women who exercised within the past 30 days received approximately 20 minutes of additional sleep compared to those who did not [ë_= 0.32 (0.16, 0.49)]. Age and employment status were found to be significantly associated with sleep duration. Sleep duration in pregnant women was associated with exercise, but not with fruit and vegetable consumption. More descriptive data regarding exercise, diet, sleep quantity, sleep quality and family status may reveal a greater association with sleep duration than observed. Future research should include additional comorbidities such as gestational diabetes, family medical history, Category C sleep aids and other medications as potential confounders.