Presentation Title

Visual Data in Glazing

Location

Room 2901

Session Format

Paper Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Humanities & Social Sciences - Performing & Visual Arts

Abstract

Through visual arts presentation in the Humanities myself and Prof. Jeff Schmuki intend to conduct ceramic glaze testing to determine the most chemically suitable "base glaze" to which colorants can be added and then fired in both oxidation and reduction. This process involves the creation of chemical formulas from dry glaze materials, which are then applied to bisqued clay test tiles. These tiles will be fired in two different types of kiln firings, oxidation (the presence of oxygen) and reduction (the lack of oxygen). The purpose for the dual firings is to determine new glaze formulas that do not craze (fracture), fissure, or flux (run) in both electric and gas fired kilns. Once tested and visually examined the formulas can then be mass produced into classroom size quantities for students to use. The data to be collected will not be quantitative, as the results from the test tiles are judged purely from a visual and tactile standpoint. These tests however will aid in teaching Ceramics 1- Advanced Ceramics, as they will provide a visual for students to see and feel prior to glazing their own pieces in the classroom. We intend to show a visual display of the physical test tiles for the public to view and feel as well as a full description of materials and what role they play in the production of the glazes. The overall significant outcome from these tests that we want to achieve is a variety of vibrantly colored glazes that fire well in both oxidation and reduction, without flaws and are good grade safe. Dual glazes work best in a classroom setting and will provide students a hands on visual of the glaze they would like to put in their own ceramic pieces. In addition to the valuable knowledge gained from formulating classroom based glazes, this research will also provide data for my studio practice. For my graduate research, I am working primarily in ceramics and learning how to formulate glazes from scratch with the aid of Prof. Jeff Schmuki. Understanding what different glaze materials do in both oxidation and reduction, and how to adjust the formulas properly will be the basis to my research when I reach my senior thesis exhibition. Overall we believe that through testing we will achieve new, unique and visually pleasing ceramic "base formulas" to which colorants can be added by the students and myself. These glazes will be stable (not drip off the ceramic piece) none hazardous (sharp, brittle, or porous), and food safe, which is the ultimate end goal of our testing.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

4-16-2016 5:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 4:00 PM Apr 16th, 5:00 PM

Visual Data in Glazing

Room 2901

Through visual arts presentation in the Humanities myself and Prof. Jeff Schmuki intend to conduct ceramic glaze testing to determine the most chemically suitable "base glaze" to which colorants can be added and then fired in both oxidation and reduction. This process involves the creation of chemical formulas from dry glaze materials, which are then applied to bisqued clay test tiles. These tiles will be fired in two different types of kiln firings, oxidation (the presence of oxygen) and reduction (the lack of oxygen). The purpose for the dual firings is to determine new glaze formulas that do not craze (fracture), fissure, or flux (run) in both electric and gas fired kilns. Once tested and visually examined the formulas can then be mass produced into classroom size quantities for students to use. The data to be collected will not be quantitative, as the results from the test tiles are judged purely from a visual and tactile standpoint. These tests however will aid in teaching Ceramics 1- Advanced Ceramics, as they will provide a visual for students to see and feel prior to glazing their own pieces in the classroom. We intend to show a visual display of the physical test tiles for the public to view and feel as well as a full description of materials and what role they play in the production of the glazes. The overall significant outcome from these tests that we want to achieve is a variety of vibrantly colored glazes that fire well in both oxidation and reduction, without flaws and are good grade safe. Dual glazes work best in a classroom setting and will provide students a hands on visual of the glaze they would like to put in their own ceramic pieces. In addition to the valuable knowledge gained from formulating classroom based glazes, this research will also provide data for my studio practice. For my graduate research, I am working primarily in ceramics and learning how to formulate glazes from scratch with the aid of Prof. Jeff Schmuki. Understanding what different glaze materials do in both oxidation and reduction, and how to adjust the formulas properly will be the basis to my research when I reach my senior thesis exhibition. Overall we believe that through testing we will achieve new, unique and visually pleasing ceramic "base formulas" to which colorants can be added by the students and myself. These glazes will be stable (not drip off the ceramic piece) none hazardous (sharp, brittle, or porous), and food safe, which is the ultimate end goal of our testing.