Presentation Title

Sodium Indicator in Embryonic Systems

Location

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Natural & Physical Sciences - Biology

Abstract

Ions play an important role in cell signaling. There are many different types of ions including calcium, chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium, in particular, plays an important role in transmitting signals between neurons and maintaining an electrolyte balance. Imbalances in sodium ions can result in several diseases, such as epilepsy and heart failure Cells must maintain an equilibrium of ions inside and outside the cell. The unequal distribution of ions across the membrane results in a polarization and this is known as the membrane potential. In a neuron, upon being stimulated by some stimuli, ion channels located along the cell membrane will open, allowing an influx of sodium ions into the neuron, causing depolarization. This is then followed by the opening of potassium ion channels which allows an outflow of potassium ions, in a process known as repolarization. This process is known as an action potential and serves as an electrical signal between neurons. The action potential travels along the length of the axon and stimulates the release of another neurotransmitter which is then passed to the next neuron. Currently, visualizing sodium concentrations has been limited to cell culture. The main aim of this study was to identify a method in which we could visualize the distribution of sodium ions in whole organisms (in vivo). In order to do this, we designed an experiment in which we stained 3-day and 5-day zebrafish embryos with CoroNa green dye, which is a green-fluorescent sodium indicator. Utilizing the confocal microscope, embryos were visualized. Embryos will be analyzed for sodium distribution levels throughout the body. The expected results are to be able to visualize intracellular and extracellular concentrations of sodium. Knowledge of sodium concentrations will prove useful in providing a deeper understanding of the role of sodium in cell signaling in neurons.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-16-2016 12:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 10:45 AM Apr 16th, 12:00 PM

Sodium Indicator in Embryonic Systems

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Ions play an important role in cell signaling. There are many different types of ions including calcium, chloride, potassium, and sodium. Sodium, in particular, plays an important role in transmitting signals between neurons and maintaining an electrolyte balance. Imbalances in sodium ions can result in several diseases, such as epilepsy and heart failure Cells must maintain an equilibrium of ions inside and outside the cell. The unequal distribution of ions across the membrane results in a polarization and this is known as the membrane potential. In a neuron, upon being stimulated by some stimuli, ion channels located along the cell membrane will open, allowing an influx of sodium ions into the neuron, causing depolarization. This is then followed by the opening of potassium ion channels which allows an outflow of potassium ions, in a process known as repolarization. This process is known as an action potential and serves as an electrical signal between neurons. The action potential travels along the length of the axon and stimulates the release of another neurotransmitter which is then passed to the next neuron. Currently, visualizing sodium concentrations has been limited to cell culture. The main aim of this study was to identify a method in which we could visualize the distribution of sodium ions in whole organisms (in vivo). In order to do this, we designed an experiment in which we stained 3-day and 5-day zebrafish embryos with CoroNa green dye, which is a green-fluorescent sodium indicator. Utilizing the confocal microscope, embryos were visualized. Embryos will be analyzed for sodium distribution levels throughout the body. The expected results are to be able to visualize intracellular and extracellular concentrations of sodium. Knowledge of sodium concentrations will prove useful in providing a deeper understanding of the role of sodium in cell signaling in neurons.