Presentation Title

The Effectiveness of Teaching Life Skills through Sport-Based Interventions for At-Risk Youth

Location

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Exercise Science & Human Performance - Exercise Science

Abstract

At-risk youth are children and adolescents who live in a negative environment and/or do not possess the skills they need in becoming responsible members of society (Collingwood, 1997). Many of these youth experience adjustment difficulties, behavioral problems, academic failure and dropout, or mental health difficulties (Moreau et al., 2012). A current resource for these youth has been sport-based to measure the benefits of psychosocial wellbeing among the adolescents. However, most of these studies have simply used sport or physical activity as the intervention rather than incorporating life skills into it (Lubans, Plotnikoff, & Lubans, 2012; Dunn, 2014). The current study analyzed the effectiveness of a life skills program that used sport in a population of at-risk youth. The life skills program has only previously been used among sport teams (SUPER; Danish, 2002). The current study used a single subject design where each individual served as his own control, and the researcher was able to work individually with each participant. The researcher worked with three participants during their regular school physical education time where basketball was used to teach life skills to these youth. The life skills included managing emotions, goal setting, relaxation, confidence, mental preparation, and seeking help from others. Each module had the students play or perform an aspect of basketball while incorporating the various skills. The participants would then respond to a portion of the Life Skills Transfer Survey (Weiss, Bolter, & Kipp, 2014) as well as a portion of the Ottawa Mental Skills Assessment Tool (Durand-Bush, Salmela, & Green-Demers, 2001) to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The data analysis will include visual inspection of the graphic representations of each life skill. Results from this study could lead to a better understanding of resources that should be offered to at-risk youth.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-16-2016 12:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 10:45 AM Apr 16th, 12:00 PM

The Effectiveness of Teaching Life Skills through Sport-Based Interventions for At-Risk Youth

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

At-risk youth are children and adolescents who live in a negative environment and/or do not possess the skills they need in becoming responsible members of society (Collingwood, 1997). Many of these youth experience adjustment difficulties, behavioral problems, academic failure and dropout, or mental health difficulties (Moreau et al., 2012). A current resource for these youth has been sport-based to measure the benefits of psychosocial wellbeing among the adolescents. However, most of these studies have simply used sport or physical activity as the intervention rather than incorporating life skills into it (Lubans, Plotnikoff, & Lubans, 2012; Dunn, 2014). The current study analyzed the effectiveness of a life skills program that used sport in a population of at-risk youth. The life skills program has only previously been used among sport teams (SUPER; Danish, 2002). The current study used a single subject design where each individual served as his own control, and the researcher was able to work individually with each participant. The researcher worked with three participants during their regular school physical education time where basketball was used to teach life skills to these youth. The life skills included managing emotions, goal setting, relaxation, confidence, mental preparation, and seeking help from others. Each module had the students play or perform an aspect of basketball while incorporating the various skills. The participants would then respond to a portion of the Life Skills Transfer Survey (Weiss, Bolter, & Kipp, 2014) as well as a portion of the Ottawa Mental Skills Assessment Tool (Durand-Bush, Salmela, & Green-Demers, 2001) to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The data analysis will include visual inspection of the graphic representations of each life skill. Results from this study could lead to a better understanding of resources that should be offered to at-risk youth.