Presentation Title

Socioeconomic Status in Research and Education

Location

Room 2905 B

Session Format

Roundtable or Panel

Research Area Topic:

Exercise Science & Human Performance - Exercise Science

Abstract

Socioeconomic status (SES) is an economic and sociological combined term that is characterized by many encompassing factors that include income level, educational level, and occupation. The World Health Organization’s and the CDC Social Determinants of Health list socioeconomic status (income, occupation, educational attainment) as separate categories from race, but some health care professionals do not recognize the much broader reach of SES. The continued belief that those within the lower socioeconomic categories are only ethnically diverse has affected clinical and educational practice but is not supported by research. As such, low SES populations in need of essential health care are being ignored in education, research and medical care. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals deemed of lower SES have greater incidence of heart disease, lung cancer and diabetes, with explanations due to a poor diet, decreased exercise and higher levels of smoking. Combining these conditions with limited access to care, can result in inadequate educational, medical and community interventions. Studies of young children suggest that higher Socioeconomic Status (SES) translates into higher performance on most tests and academics. Unpublished pilot data provide initial evidence that a lower socioeconomic urban school district demonstrated cognitive test scores that are 10% lower than published normative data provided by the computerized testing company. While the theoretical framework that urban, low SES students are different is not new, the causes and factors associated with this difference are vast and poorly researched. Clinicians and educators need to understand the barriers that exist and successful strategies to effect change in this population. This session will provide evidence of successful clinical care paradigms and research standards for clinicians and educators working in low SES healthcare and community settings. Additionally, it will address innovative societal-level health care and education changes to support both consumers and professionals.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:30 AM

End Date

4-16-2016 10:30 AM

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Apr 16th, 9:30 AM Apr 16th, 10:30 AM

Socioeconomic Status in Research and Education

Room 2905 B

Socioeconomic status (SES) is an economic and sociological combined term that is characterized by many encompassing factors that include income level, educational level, and occupation. The World Health Organization’s and the CDC Social Determinants of Health list socioeconomic status (income, occupation, educational attainment) as separate categories from race, but some health care professionals do not recognize the much broader reach of SES. The continued belief that those within the lower socioeconomic categories are only ethnically diverse has affected clinical and educational practice but is not supported by research. As such, low SES populations in need of essential health care are being ignored in education, research and medical care. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals deemed of lower SES have greater incidence of heart disease, lung cancer and diabetes, with explanations due to a poor diet, decreased exercise and higher levels of smoking. Combining these conditions with limited access to care, can result in inadequate educational, medical and community interventions. Studies of young children suggest that higher Socioeconomic Status (SES) translates into higher performance on most tests and academics. Unpublished pilot data provide initial evidence that a lower socioeconomic urban school district demonstrated cognitive test scores that are 10% lower than published normative data provided by the computerized testing company. While the theoretical framework that urban, low SES students are different is not new, the causes and factors associated with this difference are vast and poorly researched. Clinicians and educators need to understand the barriers that exist and successful strategies to effect change in this population. This session will provide evidence of successful clinical care paradigms and research standards for clinicians and educators working in low SES healthcare and community settings. Additionally, it will address innovative societal-level health care and education changes to support both consumers and professionals.