Presentation Title

Discovery of Novel Quinolone Derived Compounds as Psychotherapeutic Agents

Location

Room 2903

Session Format

Paper Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Natural & Physical Sciences - Biology

Abstract

The invention of psychotropic agents changed the face of medicine as it allowed for the prevention of psychological and somatic adverse effects caused by trauma or mental disorders. Psychotropic agents are a loosely defined group of drugs which affect consciousness through pharmacological action on the nervous system. Current psychotropic agents act as anxiolytics, antidepressants, hallucinogens and anesthetics. These compounds may reduce anxiety, relieve pain, and compensate for mental irregularities, but are also responsible for serious complications, including paralysis and death. The discovery of novel psychotropic agents which exhibit high potency and low toxicity remain in high demand. The present study aims to identify the psychotropic potential of quinolone-derived compounds as well as investigate possible mechanisms by which these compounds may be working. The initial screening of ten quinolone derivatives revealed a varying degree of effects on motor function in fish. Briefly, we are employing the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model system to study the biological activity of three Quinolone derivatives. Preliminary data show that treated zebrafish embryos exhibit a reduction in motor activity, loss of balance, and failure to respond to touch. To further explore the behavioral consequences of these compounds, zebrafish embryos will be monitored using the Daniovision, a high through-put tracking device and EthoVision XT Noldus software. As the concentration of the compound administered changes, the degree of phenotype observed also changes, indicating possible dose-dependence. Based on these preliminary results, we now look to identify possible mechanisms for these compounds. Anesthetics commonly work by modulating the exchange of ions across the membrane. These Quinolone derivatives, which have not been previously described, produce some novel pharmacological properties such as a reversible sedative effect, which could be due to the blockage of sodium channels in neurons. We are further investigating the role of these compounds in the transport of neurologically relevant ions such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and chloride. Our initial drug screening has resulted in the identification of three quinolone derived compounds capable of producing a reversible anesthetic phenotype.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:30 AM

End Date

4-16-2016 10:30 AM

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Apr 16th, 9:30 AM Apr 16th, 10:30 AM

Discovery of Novel Quinolone Derived Compounds as Psychotherapeutic Agents

Room 2903

The invention of psychotropic agents changed the face of medicine as it allowed for the prevention of psychological and somatic adverse effects caused by trauma or mental disorders. Psychotropic agents are a loosely defined group of drugs which affect consciousness through pharmacological action on the nervous system. Current psychotropic agents act as anxiolytics, antidepressants, hallucinogens and anesthetics. These compounds may reduce anxiety, relieve pain, and compensate for mental irregularities, but are also responsible for serious complications, including paralysis and death. The discovery of novel psychotropic agents which exhibit high potency and low toxicity remain in high demand. The present study aims to identify the psychotropic potential of quinolone-derived compounds as well as investigate possible mechanisms by which these compounds may be working. The initial screening of ten quinolone derivatives revealed a varying degree of effects on motor function in fish. Briefly, we are employing the zebrafish (Danio rerio) model system to study the biological activity of three Quinolone derivatives. Preliminary data show that treated zebrafish embryos exhibit a reduction in motor activity, loss of balance, and failure to respond to touch. To further explore the behavioral consequences of these compounds, zebrafish embryos will be monitored using the Daniovision, a high through-put tracking device and EthoVision XT Noldus software. As the concentration of the compound administered changes, the degree of phenotype observed also changes, indicating possible dose-dependence. Based on these preliminary results, we now look to identify possible mechanisms for these compounds. Anesthetics commonly work by modulating the exchange of ions across the membrane. These Quinolone derivatives, which have not been previously described, produce some novel pharmacological properties such as a reversible sedative effect, which could be due to the blockage of sodium channels in neurons. We are further investigating the role of these compounds in the transport of neurologically relevant ions such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and chloride. Our initial drug screening has resulted in the identification of three quinolone derived compounds capable of producing a reversible anesthetic phenotype.