Presentation Title

Using a Phenomenological Approach in Research with Nonstudents and Other Underrepresented Populations

Location

Room 2905 A

Session Format

Paper Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Qualitative Research

Abstract

Phenomenology is a qualitative methodology used to explore individuals’ lived experiences using unbiased techniques. Researchers avoid over-participation during data generation and remain true to the specific language of the individuals being studied in order to allow for the emergence and accurate representation of natural perceptions. By doing so, this process gives a voice to those who have not been heard and allows for the construction and understanding of meaningful realities from the perspectives of those who have lived these events. Given that true knowledge is relative (Boss, Dahl, & Kaplan, 1996, p.83), phenomenology is most appropriate in capturing the reality of underrepresented communicates. For decades, those not in higher education have been deemed as the Forgotten Half (William T. Grant Foundation Commission on Work, Family, and Citizenship, 1988) for various reasons. The accessibility to college student communities provides convenient sampling opportunities among scholars conducting research. As a result, certain bodies of literature are disproportionately representative of privileged, college student. Furthermore, the ever increasing value placed on a college education in America has created an environment where success and prestige are reserved for those who pursue and complete such endeavors. Recent data has suggested that 58% of young people were not enrolled in postsecondary education in 2011 (U.S. Department of Education, 2013) and 40% of those that were enrolled in 2007 did not complete this training within a six year period (U.S. Department of Education, 2015). With the majority of young people not pursuing a college education following high school and the prevalence of education disruption among those that do pursue college, society must reconsider the ways in which certain American ideologies impact young people. A starting point for doing so starts with conversations among scholars regarding effective techniques in accessing and understanding these hidden populations.

Several types of phenomenology exist and for this roundtable discussion, the style of Moustakas's (1994) transcendental phenomenology will be the point of focus including aspects regarding data collection and analysis. To the author’s knowledge there is currently no phenomenology research group established at Georgia Southern University. The feasibility and usefulness of such collaborative research support will be debated. Additionally, the application of phenomenological methodologies to understand other underrepresented populations outside of nonstudents will also be discussed. Lastly, techniques for accessing hidden populations will be considered.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:30 AM

End Date

4-16-2016 10:30 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:30 AM Apr 16th, 10:30 AM

Using a Phenomenological Approach in Research with Nonstudents and Other Underrepresented Populations

Room 2905 A

Phenomenology is a qualitative methodology used to explore individuals’ lived experiences using unbiased techniques. Researchers avoid over-participation during data generation and remain true to the specific language of the individuals being studied in order to allow for the emergence and accurate representation of natural perceptions. By doing so, this process gives a voice to those who have not been heard and allows for the construction and understanding of meaningful realities from the perspectives of those who have lived these events. Given that true knowledge is relative (Boss, Dahl, & Kaplan, 1996, p.83), phenomenology is most appropriate in capturing the reality of underrepresented communicates. For decades, those not in higher education have been deemed as the Forgotten Half (William T. Grant Foundation Commission on Work, Family, and Citizenship, 1988) for various reasons. The accessibility to college student communities provides convenient sampling opportunities among scholars conducting research. As a result, certain bodies of literature are disproportionately representative of privileged, college student. Furthermore, the ever increasing value placed on a college education in America has created an environment where success and prestige are reserved for those who pursue and complete such endeavors. Recent data has suggested that 58% of young people were not enrolled in postsecondary education in 2011 (U.S. Department of Education, 2013) and 40% of those that were enrolled in 2007 did not complete this training within a six year period (U.S. Department of Education, 2015). With the majority of young people not pursuing a college education following high school and the prevalence of education disruption among those that do pursue college, society must reconsider the ways in which certain American ideologies impact young people. A starting point for doing so starts with conversations among scholars regarding effective techniques in accessing and understanding these hidden populations.

Several types of phenomenology exist and for this roundtable discussion, the style of Moustakas's (1994) transcendental phenomenology will be the point of focus including aspects regarding data collection and analysis. To the author’s knowledge there is currently no phenomenology research group established at Georgia Southern University. The feasibility and usefulness of such collaborative research support will be debated. Additionally, the application of phenomenological methodologies to understand other underrepresented populations outside of nonstudents will also be discussed. Lastly, techniques for accessing hidden populations will be considered.