Presenter Information

Grace FoxFollow

Presentation Title

In Search for the Computational Logic of the Brain

Location

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Natural & Physical Sciences - Biology

Abstract

Imagine if all molecular and cellular parts were available, what is the design principle that should be used in generating brains? To address this question, we propose a wiring logic that yields the basic computational principle for coordinating the microarchitecture of cell assemblies that permits the emergence of knowledge and flexible behavior. This concept is based on what we term the power-of-two-based, specific-to-general combinatorial connectivity logic. We suggest that at the level of cell assemblies, the brain is made of functional connectivity motifs (FCMs). Defined by the power-of-two based equation, N = 2^i‰öÕ1, each FCM consists of principal projection neuron cliques (N), ranging from those specific cliques receiving specific information inputs (i) to general and sub-general cliques receiving various combinatorial convergent inputs. We propose that this wiring logic should be carried out in many brain regions regardless of anatomical variation, and should also hold true for different cognitive computing and across animal species. Here, we test these predictions by using large-scale in vivo recording techniques to evaluate functional connectivity patterns of cell assemblies while animals are subjected to cognitively important stimuli. We found that this logic is robust across multiple brain regions, distinct cognitive tasks ranging from social interaction to fearful episodes, and is conserved across different animal species. Thus, these three predictions were met, and this provides evidence that the power-of-two-based, specific-to-general combinatorial connectivity logic is implemented at the level of cell assemblies in the brain.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:45 AM

End Date

4-16-2016 12:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 10:45 AM Apr 16th, 12:00 PM

In Search for the Computational Logic of the Brain

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Imagine if all molecular and cellular parts were available, what is the design principle that should be used in generating brains? To address this question, we propose a wiring logic that yields the basic computational principle for coordinating the microarchitecture of cell assemblies that permits the emergence of knowledge and flexible behavior. This concept is based on what we term the power-of-two-based, specific-to-general combinatorial connectivity logic. We suggest that at the level of cell assemblies, the brain is made of functional connectivity motifs (FCMs). Defined by the power-of-two based equation, N = 2^i‰öÕ1, each FCM consists of principal projection neuron cliques (N), ranging from those specific cliques receiving specific information inputs (i) to general and sub-general cliques receiving various combinatorial convergent inputs. We propose that this wiring logic should be carried out in many brain regions regardless of anatomical variation, and should also hold true for different cognitive computing and across animal species. Here, we test these predictions by using large-scale in vivo recording techniques to evaluate functional connectivity patterns of cell assemblies while animals are subjected to cognitively important stimuli. We found that this logic is robust across multiple brain regions, distinct cognitive tasks ranging from social interaction to fearful episodes, and is conserved across different animal species. Thus, these three predictions were met, and this provides evidence that the power-of-two-based, specific-to-general combinatorial connectivity logic is implemented at the level of cell assemblies in the brain.