Location

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Engineering and Material Sciences - Civil

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

M. Maghiarand (Georgia Southern University)

G. Maldonado (Georgia Southern University)

Mariah Peartand (Georgia Southern University)

Jacob McCranie (Georgia Southern University)

M. Jackson (Georgia Southern University)

Abstract

The accurate detection of road vehicle heights is a need that arises in departments of transportation across the nation. Usually, this dimension is required to solve various transportation issues. In particular, numerous bridges in the state of Georgia have been affected by repetitive crashes of tall vehicles against their structural elements. As an example, a recent inspection report of the Houlihan Bridge over the Savannah River documents damages resulting from numerous hits by overheight vehicles. This case emphasizes the urgency of finding preventive measures. To address this issue, a number of solutions are investigated. The known methods of vehicle height detection are based on different approaches employing various types of sensors. Each approach provides a specific mechanism for detecting and classifying vehicles based on their heights. Since user needs and desired classification results may differ, investigating existing detection techniques and systems with specific advantages is of great interest for Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT). Currently, early warning systems exist for tall load vehicles, and there are a few identified highway projects focusing on this topic. These projects are included in the Transportation Research Board (TRB) databases. Additionally, some of the newer systems show extra functionalities, such as vehicle type classification, detection of two dimensions of vehicle profiles, and the photographic acquisition of license plate information. However, some of these solutions are costly and may not necessarily target the particular needs of GDOT. Therefore, the proposed research is to identify adequate, cost effective and efficient systems for GDOT.

Keywords

Bridge, Retrofit, Civil engineering, Overheight clearance, GDOT

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

4-16-2016 4:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 2:45 PM Apr 16th, 4:00 PM

Warning Systems Evaluation for Overhead Clearance Detection

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

The accurate detection of road vehicle heights is a need that arises in departments of transportation across the nation. Usually, this dimension is required to solve various transportation issues. In particular, numerous bridges in the state of Georgia have been affected by repetitive crashes of tall vehicles against their structural elements. As an example, a recent inspection report of the Houlihan Bridge over the Savannah River documents damages resulting from numerous hits by overheight vehicles. This case emphasizes the urgency of finding preventive measures. To address this issue, a number of solutions are investigated. The known methods of vehicle height detection are based on different approaches employing various types of sensors. Each approach provides a specific mechanism for detecting and classifying vehicles based on their heights. Since user needs and desired classification results may differ, investigating existing detection techniques and systems with specific advantages is of great interest for Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT). Currently, early warning systems exist for tall load vehicles, and there are a few identified highway projects focusing on this topic. These projects are included in the Transportation Research Board (TRB) databases. Additionally, some of the newer systems show extra functionalities, such as vehicle type classification, detection of two dimensions of vehicle profiles, and the photographic acquisition of license plate information. However, some of these solutions are costly and may not necessarily target the particular needs of GDOT. Therefore, the proposed research is to identify adequate, cost effective and efficient systems for GDOT.