Presentation Title

Controlled Accentuation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cancer Cell Models by Redox-Active Molecular Probes

Location

Room 2905 A

Session Format

Paper Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Natural & Physical Sciences - Chemistry

Abstract

Normal cellular metabolism generates intracellular by-products identified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). While ROS levels are safely maintained by the antioxidant pathway, the rapid metabolism of cancer cells causes unusually high levels of ROS. These cells survive due to the continued function of antioxidants, but the equilibrium between ROS generation and ROS reduction by antioxidants is significantly closer to lethal ROS levels than that of healthy cells. To capitalize on this difference, we have synthesized and continue to mechanistically study various gold N-heterocyclic carbenes that incorporate additional redox-active moieties capable of influencing ROS levels in cancer cells. These efforts have led to the development of complexes capable of inducing enhanced ROS formation and persistence by targeting antioxidant pathways via multiple mechanisms. Multiple human carcinoma cell lines have been utilized in this research to model the action of these complexes in different tumor types.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

4-16-2016 5:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 4:00 PM Apr 16th, 5:00 PM

Controlled Accentuation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cancer Cell Models by Redox-Active Molecular Probes

Room 2905 A

Normal cellular metabolism generates intracellular by-products identified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). While ROS levels are safely maintained by the antioxidant pathway, the rapid metabolism of cancer cells causes unusually high levels of ROS. These cells survive due to the continued function of antioxidants, but the equilibrium between ROS generation and ROS reduction by antioxidants is significantly closer to lethal ROS levels than that of healthy cells. To capitalize on this difference, we have synthesized and continue to mechanistically study various gold N-heterocyclic carbenes that incorporate additional redox-active moieties capable of influencing ROS levels in cancer cells. These efforts have led to the development of complexes capable of inducing enhanced ROS formation and persistence by targeting antioxidant pathways via multiple mechanisms. Multiple human carcinoma cell lines have been utilized in this research to model the action of these complexes in different tumor types.