Presentation Title

Understanding and Promoting Breastfeeding among African American Women in the Rural South

Location

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Qualitative Research

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: African American women (AAW) have lower rates of breastfeeding than whites and other U.S. minority groups. Along with its many maternal and child health benefits, research indicates breastfeeding can reduce the risk of developing triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with higher mortalities and incidence in AAW. Thus, increasing breastfeeding can be an important strategy for addressing breast cancer health disparities, particularly among AAW. METHODS: The present study is a formative research to ultimately determine whether increased awareness that breastfeeding reduces breast cancer and TNBC risk will positively alter AAW's overall evaluation of breastfeeding outcomes to influences her breastfeeding decision-making. Drawing on the Theory of Planned Behavior, we examine AAW's beliefs, attitudes and motivations that underlie breastfeeding decision-making and their perceptions of breast cancer risk and prevention using a mixed-method approach that comprises a survey supplemented by an in-depth interview. In collaboration with the Enterprise Community Healthy Start (ECHS) that provides pre- and postnatal support services to predominantly AA women in rural Southern communities, data collection is ongoing in a sample of AA pregnant women enrolled in the ECHS. RESULTS: Preliminary analysis of 10 interviews to date showed that all of the participants had an intention and desire to breastfeed, but many (n=6) lacked a realistic plan to manage breastfeeding and address expected barriers. Those with intention and confidence displayed more thought through plans to breastfeed. When asked to talk about breast cancer, most (n=8) participants demonstrated fear and avoidance of the topic. Participants generally lacked knowledge about TNBC and the benefits of breastfeeding on breast cancer and TNBC prevention (n=10), and some

Keywords

African american, Women, Breastfeeding, Triple-negative breast cancer, Breast cancer, TNBC, Rural, South

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-16-2016 2:45 PM

End Date

4-16-2016 4:00 PM

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Apr 16th, 2:45 PM Apr 16th, 4:00 PM

Understanding and Promoting Breastfeeding among African American Women in the Rural South

Nessmith-Lane Atrium

INTRODUCTION: African American women (AAW) have lower rates of breastfeeding than whites and other U.S. minority groups. Along with its many maternal and child health benefits, research indicates breastfeeding can reduce the risk of developing triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), an aggressive subtype of breast cancer with higher mortalities and incidence in AAW. Thus, increasing breastfeeding can be an important strategy for addressing breast cancer health disparities, particularly among AAW. METHODS: The present study is a formative research to ultimately determine whether increased awareness that breastfeeding reduces breast cancer and TNBC risk will positively alter AAW's overall evaluation of breastfeeding outcomes to influences her breastfeeding decision-making. Drawing on the Theory of Planned Behavior, we examine AAW's beliefs, attitudes and motivations that underlie breastfeeding decision-making and their perceptions of breast cancer risk and prevention using a mixed-method approach that comprises a survey supplemented by an in-depth interview. In collaboration with the Enterprise Community Healthy Start (ECHS) that provides pre- and postnatal support services to predominantly AA women in rural Southern communities, data collection is ongoing in a sample of AA pregnant women enrolled in the ECHS. RESULTS: Preliminary analysis of 10 interviews to date showed that all of the participants had an intention and desire to breastfeed, but many (n=6) lacked a realistic plan to manage breastfeeding and address expected barriers. Those with intention and confidence displayed more thought through plans to breastfeed. When asked to talk about breast cancer, most (n=8) participants demonstrated fear and avoidance of the topic. Participants generally lacked knowledge about TNBC and the benefits of breastfeeding on breast cancer and TNBC prevention (n=10), and some