Presentation Title

Technostalgia and the Aesthetic of Glitch: Transcoding Audio into Video using CRT Monitors

Location

Room 2908

Session Format

Performing Arts or Visual Arts

Research Area Topic:

Humanities & Social Sciences - Performing & Visual Arts

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Dr. John Thompson (faculty advisor)

Abstract

Technostalgia is the longing for what many consider outdated technology. Technostalgia also coincides with the glitch aesthetic: an anti-movement of the polished, slick, perfect digital era. Transcoding or translating audio signal into video signal through DYI VGA cables embodies both of these aesthetics. By soldering audio jacks onto the VGA header, audio signal can drive RGB and Vertical and Horizontal Sync of a Cathode Ray Tube computer monitor. The research studies how different audio waveforms, frequencies (both audible and inaudible), and audio signal processing create vastly different visuals on these repurposed CRT computer monitors from yesteryear.

Keywords

Technostalgia, Glitch, CRT, Audiovisual, DYI, Installation

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 2:30 PM

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Apr 24th, 1:30 PM Apr 24th, 2:30 PM

Technostalgia and the Aesthetic of Glitch: Transcoding Audio into Video using CRT Monitors

Room 2908

Technostalgia is the longing for what many consider outdated technology. Technostalgia also coincides with the glitch aesthetic: an anti-movement of the polished, slick, perfect digital era. Transcoding or translating audio signal into video signal through DYI VGA cables embodies both of these aesthetics. By soldering audio jacks onto the VGA header, audio signal can drive RGB and Vertical and Horizontal Sync of a Cathode Ray Tube computer monitor. The research studies how different audio waveforms, frequencies (both audible and inaudible), and audio signal processing create vastly different visuals on these repurposed CRT computer monitors from yesteryear.