Presentation Title

The Role of MyoX in Craniofacial Development in Zebrafish

Location

Room 2911

Session Format

Paper Presentation

Research Area Topic:

MBI - Molecular Biology Initiative

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Vinoth Sittaramane

Abstract

Craniofacial development is the process of laying early cartilage and bone patterns in the anterior region of the embryo, which ultimately results in shaping the structure of the face and head of an organism. It is also an extensively evolving trait that helps in adapting to the changing morphological and functional requirements of a species. Further, craniofacial abnormalities in humans, such as cleft lip and palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Therefore, investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in craniofacial development would help us understand both the evolutionary and genetic disease processes. Craniofacial cartilage and bone structures are almost entirely derived from neural crest cells. Neural crest are a pluripotent migratory stream of cells that originate from the early developing brain and settle in final positions that give rise to the future skull and face. Several motor proteins are implicated in the migration of these neural crest cells. We have identified and isolated zebrafish myosinX mutants with defective craniofacial development. Currently, we are characterizing the role of myosinX in craniofacial development using various staining techniques. Alcian blue staining was used to identify specific defects within the cartilage, specifically ceratobranchial arches 3-5 appeared to be distorted or completely missing in myosinX deficient embryos. MyoX morphant individuals display near total loss of craniofacial cartilage structures while maintaining CNCC integrity as seen using immunohistochemical staining. Different stages of morphant individuals maintain the same relative number of cells indicating problems within the migratory pathways of these cells and that the loss of structures is not due to premature cell death. This study shows that in both morphant and mutant individuals, myoX is necessary and required for craniofacial development in zebrafish.

Keywords

myoX, Myosin, Developmental, Motor protein

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 2:30 PM

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Apr 24th, 1:30 PM Apr 24th, 2:30 PM

The Role of MyoX in Craniofacial Development in Zebrafish

Room 2911

Craniofacial development is the process of laying early cartilage and bone patterns in the anterior region of the embryo, which ultimately results in shaping the structure of the face and head of an organism. It is also an extensively evolving trait that helps in adapting to the changing morphological and functional requirements of a species. Further, craniofacial abnormalities in humans, such as cleft lip and palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Therefore, investigating the molecular mechanisms involved in craniofacial development would help us understand both the evolutionary and genetic disease processes. Craniofacial cartilage and bone structures are almost entirely derived from neural crest cells. Neural crest are a pluripotent migratory stream of cells that originate from the early developing brain and settle in final positions that give rise to the future skull and face. Several motor proteins are implicated in the migration of these neural crest cells. We have identified and isolated zebrafish myosinX mutants with defective craniofacial development. Currently, we are characterizing the role of myosinX in craniofacial development using various staining techniques. Alcian blue staining was used to identify specific defects within the cartilage, specifically ceratobranchial arches 3-5 appeared to be distorted or completely missing in myosinX deficient embryos. MyoX morphant individuals display near total loss of craniofacial cartilage structures while maintaining CNCC integrity as seen using immunohistochemical staining. Different stages of morphant individuals maintain the same relative number of cells indicating problems within the migratory pathways of these cells and that the loss of structures is not due to premature cell death. This study shows that in both morphant and mutant individuals, myoX is necessary and required for craniofacial development in zebrafish.