Presentation Title

The Three Faces of Iraq

Location

Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Humanities & Social Sciences - Cultural, Ethic, & Gender Studies

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Dr. Darin Van Tassell

Dr. Ahmet Akturk

Abstract

The Three Faces of Iraq

By Megan Bright

A Nation in a global sense can be defined in terms of language, ethnicity, religion, or a common historical experience. [1] In Iraq today, many do not align themselves with the overlying national government but instead recognize themselves into one of three nations: Arab Shi’a, Arab Sunni or Kurdish Sunni. This muddling of political, religious and cultural borders has made it difficult for the Iraqi government to achieve absolute sovereignty and has slowed the progress of domestic policy. An Iraq nation-state has long been under siege be it from foreign or domestic enemies. With the appearance of ISIS into Iraq in 2014, much of the progress that had been made in Iraq since the early 2000s was wiped away. Now many wonder if Iraqis will stand together or dissipate, each following their individual cultural, religious and ethnic leaders. This is the question that will be answered in this paper. By looking at the historical context by which modern day political and cultural environments now stand, one can understand the complexity of the situation between the three majority groups in Iraq. Secondly, this paper will address the current issues associated with domestic and foreign policy in the existing Iraqi government. This paper will also showcase in interviews of members from the groups, a personal look at how the current political situation is perceived from the three different perspectives. These interviews are meant to provide an intimate account of the current political climate in Iraq. Finally, this paper will present evidence through a comprehensive look at the terrorist organization ISIS, and the Iraqi government’s response to their threat, to answer the question of whether an Iraqi state is still a viable option or an outdated ideal.

[1] Chernotsky, Harry, and Heidi Hobbs. Crossing Borders: International Studies for the 21st Century. Los Angeles: CQ Press, 2013. (accessed January 25, 2015).

Keywords

Iraq, Shi'a, Sunni, Kurd, Nation, ISIS

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 10:45 AM

End Date

4-24-2015 12:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 10:45 AM Apr 24th, 12:00 PM

The Three Faces of Iraq

Atrium

The Three Faces of Iraq

By Megan Bright

A Nation in a global sense can be defined in terms of language, ethnicity, religion, or a common historical experience. [1] In Iraq today, many do not align themselves with the overlying national government but instead recognize themselves into one of three nations: Arab Shi’a, Arab Sunni or Kurdish Sunni. This muddling of political, religious and cultural borders has made it difficult for the Iraqi government to achieve absolute sovereignty and has slowed the progress of domestic policy. An Iraq nation-state has long been under siege be it from foreign or domestic enemies. With the appearance of ISIS into Iraq in 2014, much of the progress that had been made in Iraq since the early 2000s was wiped away. Now many wonder if Iraqis will stand together or dissipate, each following their individual cultural, religious and ethnic leaders. This is the question that will be answered in this paper. By looking at the historical context by which modern day political and cultural environments now stand, one can understand the complexity of the situation between the three majority groups in Iraq. Secondly, this paper will address the current issues associated with domestic and foreign policy in the existing Iraqi government. This paper will also showcase in interviews of members from the groups, a personal look at how the current political situation is perceived from the three different perspectives. These interviews are meant to provide an intimate account of the current political climate in Iraq. Finally, this paper will present evidence through a comprehensive look at the terrorist organization ISIS, and the Iraqi government’s response to their threat, to answer the question of whether an Iraqi state is still a viable option or an outdated ideal.

[1] Chernotsky, Harry, and Heidi Hobbs. Crossing Borders: International Studies for the 21st Century. Los Angeles: CQ Press, 2013. (accessed January 25, 2015).