Presentation Title

Brassica carinata Oilseed Biodiesel Analysis for Application in Compression-Ignition Engines

Location

Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Engineering and Material Sciences - Mechanical

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Graduate student Julia A. Heimberger

Graduate student Martin Muiños

Dr. Valentin Soloiu

Dr. Brian Koehler

Chris Butts

Abstract

Research of the production of biodiesel from Brassica carinata seed oil is continuously pursued for renewable alternative energy sources since it is of much concern regarding environmental, industrial, health and economic issues. This study focuses on the analysis of the new biofuel properties produced from a low cost biomass feedstock for determination of its suitability for internal combustion engine testing. Production and development of Carinata biodiesel have been carried out utilizing solid base catalysis methods to yield high quality biofuel from Carinata seed oil feedstock. Biodiesel quality is dependent on the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content. Lower heating value (LHV) of Ca100 (carinata 100%) was determined to be 37 MJ/kg, which is 13% lower than that of conventional diesel fuel. The dynamic viscosity of Ca100 was determined with a rotational viscometer to be 4.50 cP at 40oC, which is within the appropriate range for biodiesels according to ASTM D6751. Viscosity increased accordingly to the chain length and degree of saturation of the fatty ester molecules and decreased with increasing temperature. Oxidative stability tested by the Rancimat method, based on the induction of the oxidation of samples by exposure to elevated temperatures and airflow, determined ULSD#2 stored at 20°C would remain stable for approximately 625 days while sample FAMEs displayed an induction time of approximately 63 days. Thermal analysis was conducted by TGA-DTA to simulate fuel oxidation rates at temperatures similar to a combustion environment and determined the heat of vaporization and kinetic parameters such as activation energy and energy release. The TA10, the TA50, and TA90, (temperatures at which 10%, 50% and 90% of biofuel is vaporized), for Ca100 were determined giving a good indication of droplet vaporization rate in sprays. Results show that biodiesel vaporizes slower than ULSD#2 which correlates with the biodiesel’s higher viscosity. Cetane number (CN) is calculated by a linear regression equation based on the percentage of FAME. Blends with ULSD#2 are analyzed to observe changes in fuel properties. Future work will include further study on the efficiency of the fuel for application in Compression Ignition engine testing and emissions analysis by FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy).

Keywords

Biodiesel, Brassica carinata, Engines, Thermal analysis

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 10:45 AM

End Date

4-24-2015 12:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 10:45 AM Apr 24th, 12:00 PM

Brassica carinata Oilseed Biodiesel Analysis for Application in Compression-Ignition Engines

Atrium

Research of the production of biodiesel from Brassica carinata seed oil is continuously pursued for renewable alternative energy sources since it is of much concern regarding environmental, industrial, health and economic issues. This study focuses on the analysis of the new biofuel properties produced from a low cost biomass feedstock for determination of its suitability for internal combustion engine testing. Production and development of Carinata biodiesel have been carried out utilizing solid base catalysis methods to yield high quality biofuel from Carinata seed oil feedstock. Biodiesel quality is dependent on the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content. Lower heating value (LHV) of Ca100 (carinata 100%) was determined to be 37 MJ/kg, which is 13% lower than that of conventional diesel fuel. The dynamic viscosity of Ca100 was determined with a rotational viscometer to be 4.50 cP at 40oC, which is within the appropriate range for biodiesels according to ASTM D6751. Viscosity increased accordingly to the chain length and degree of saturation of the fatty ester molecules and decreased with increasing temperature. Oxidative stability tested by the Rancimat method, based on the induction of the oxidation of samples by exposure to elevated temperatures and airflow, determined ULSD#2 stored at 20°C would remain stable for approximately 625 days while sample FAMEs displayed an induction time of approximately 63 days. Thermal analysis was conducted by TGA-DTA to simulate fuel oxidation rates at temperatures similar to a combustion environment and determined the heat of vaporization and kinetic parameters such as activation energy and energy release. The TA10, the TA50, and TA90, (temperatures at which 10%, 50% and 90% of biofuel is vaporized), for Ca100 were determined giving a good indication of droplet vaporization rate in sprays. Results show that biodiesel vaporizes slower than ULSD#2 which correlates with the biodiesel’s higher viscosity. Cetane number (CN) is calculated by a linear regression equation based on the percentage of FAME. Blends with ULSD#2 are analyzed to observe changes in fuel properties. Future work will include further study on the efficiency of the fuel for application in Compression Ignition engine testing and emissions analysis by FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy).