Presentation Title

Smart Controls Strategy for Common Rail Systems to Achieve Super Low NOx and Soot in Multifuel Engines

Location

Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Engineering and Material Sciences - Mechanical

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Santangelo, Michael

Brown, Derek

Gleiter, Chris

Leis, Cody

Dr. Soloiu, Valentin

Abstract

The reduction of pollution emissions from combustion preserve the environment and improve the public health. The exhaust of an internal combustion diesel engine emits relatively high levels of Nitric Oxides (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM) and soot. NOx creates ozone at the atmospheric level that weakens peoples’ immune systems causing many health issues and is harmful to vegetation and wildlife. Automotive emissions are responsible for 50% of the emitted NOx in the atmosphere. Larger sized particulate matter as soot can also affect the ozone, but PM of smaller diameters are of main concern for public health. These particulates have the ability to penetrate into sensitive lungs areas and be an irritant or cause of lung and heart diseases and cancer.

The research conducted aimed to develop a smart injection strategy with multi-pulse injection pattern that is able to control the ignition delay and combustion phasing resulting is super low emissions. In order to achieve that, replacing the mechanical injection system of the diesel engine with a custom designed electronically controlled piezoelectric common-rail fuel injection system is a must. This type of system (common rail) provides flexible and complete control of the injection timing, duration of spray and dwell between injection pulses independently accordingly to the engine speed and load. The flexibility of injection characteristics results in optimized injection patterns to reduce NOx and PM emissions along with lowered fuel consumption. The system has been designed, instrumented and is calibrated with National Instruments platform with drivers, PID controllers and Hall positioning sensors. The results of experiments show a robust feedback and control with highly sensitive settings responding precisely and timely to engine parameters.

Keywords

Emissions control, Nitric oxides, Particulate matter, Ignition delay, Common rail system

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 10:45 AM

End Date

4-24-2015 12:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 10:45 AM Apr 24th, 12:00 PM

Smart Controls Strategy for Common Rail Systems to Achieve Super Low NOx and Soot in Multifuel Engines

Atrium

The reduction of pollution emissions from combustion preserve the environment and improve the public health. The exhaust of an internal combustion diesel engine emits relatively high levels of Nitric Oxides (NOx) and Particulate Matter (PM) and soot. NOx creates ozone at the atmospheric level that weakens peoples’ immune systems causing many health issues and is harmful to vegetation and wildlife. Automotive emissions are responsible for 50% of the emitted NOx in the atmosphere. Larger sized particulate matter as soot can also affect the ozone, but PM of smaller diameters are of main concern for public health. These particulates have the ability to penetrate into sensitive lungs areas and be an irritant or cause of lung and heart diseases and cancer.

The research conducted aimed to develop a smart injection strategy with multi-pulse injection pattern that is able to control the ignition delay and combustion phasing resulting is super low emissions. In order to achieve that, replacing the mechanical injection system of the diesel engine with a custom designed electronically controlled piezoelectric common-rail fuel injection system is a must. This type of system (common rail) provides flexible and complete control of the injection timing, duration of spray and dwell between injection pulses independently accordingly to the engine speed and load. The flexibility of injection characteristics results in optimized injection patterns to reduce NOx and PM emissions along with lowered fuel consumption. The system has been designed, instrumented and is calibrated with National Instruments platform with drivers, PID controllers and Hall positioning sensors. The results of experiments show a robust feedback and control with highly sensitive settings responding precisely and timely to engine parameters.