Presentation Title

Investigating Computational, Structural, Physiochemical and Biological Properties of a Family of Pyridoxine-Lanthanide Metal Complexes

Location

Room 2904 B

Session Format

Paper Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Natural & Physical Sciences - Chemistry

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Caitlyn Stouder, Khairi Warren, Berkley K Long, Dr Cliff Padgett, Dr Amanda Stewart, Dr Karelle Aiken, Dr Shainaz Landge, Dr Allison Amonette

Abstract

Pyridoxine is a vitamin and is often found in certain food like cereals, beans, eggs and so on and is required for proper growth and development of the brain, nerves, skin, and many other parts of the body. Medicinal usage of pyridoxine e.g. treating anemia, heart diseases, and angioplasty makes it an interesting choice to further study the interaction between this biomolecule with several metal ions. On other hand, lanthanide complexes have drawn significant attention to the medicinal inorganic chemists since, lanthanides manifest antitumor activity and lead towards the future anticancer drugs. Amalgamation of both the aspects of lanthanide metals and pyridoxine molecule promises an interesting premise in the area of metal based anti-cancer drugs, DNA sequence-specific cleaving agents and so on. In the quest of a new class of anticancer drugs, herein, a family of pyridoxine-lanthanide metal complexes (where metals are La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) has been synthesized and reported. The complexes were further characterized by single-crystal X-ray analyses and computational structural simulations which show that they are mononuclear pyridoxine containing metal complexes. Several spectroscopic methods such as IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis spectroscopy were employed to further study the composition and reaction mechanism of the aforementioned class of complexes. DNA is the primary target molecule for most anticancer and antiviral therapies according to cell biologists. Hence, in order to assay the DNA binding or cleaving ability of the synthesized complexes, UV-Vis and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis were performed in due course.

Keywords

Anticancer, Antiviral, Metal complexes, Pyridoxine, Lanthanide metals, DNA binding ability, Characterization, Computational, X-ray, Spectroscopic analyses

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 9:30 AM

End Date

4-24-2015 10:30 AM

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Apr 24th, 9:30 AM Apr 24th, 10:30 AM

Investigating Computational, Structural, Physiochemical and Biological Properties of a Family of Pyridoxine-Lanthanide Metal Complexes

Room 2904 B

Pyridoxine is a vitamin and is often found in certain food like cereals, beans, eggs and so on and is required for proper growth and development of the brain, nerves, skin, and many other parts of the body. Medicinal usage of pyridoxine e.g. treating anemia, heart diseases, and angioplasty makes it an interesting choice to further study the interaction between this biomolecule with several metal ions. On other hand, lanthanide complexes have drawn significant attention to the medicinal inorganic chemists since, lanthanides manifest antitumor activity and lead towards the future anticancer drugs. Amalgamation of both the aspects of lanthanide metals and pyridoxine molecule promises an interesting premise in the area of metal based anti-cancer drugs, DNA sequence-specific cleaving agents and so on. In the quest of a new class of anticancer drugs, herein, a family of pyridoxine-lanthanide metal complexes (where metals are La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) has been synthesized and reported. The complexes were further characterized by single-crystal X-ray analyses and computational structural simulations which show that they are mononuclear pyridoxine containing metal complexes. Several spectroscopic methods such as IR, 1H NMR, UV-Vis spectroscopy were employed to further study the composition and reaction mechanism of the aforementioned class of complexes. DNA is the primary target molecule for most anticancer and antiviral therapies according to cell biologists. Hence, in order to assay the DNA binding or cleaving ability of the synthesized complexes, UV-Vis and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis were performed in due course.