Presentation Title

Insects and Death: Forensic Entomology in Georgia

Location

Room 2904 B

Session Format

Paper Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Natural & Physical Sciences - Biology

Abstract

After 72 hours, entomological evidence from a death scene is the most accurate method for determining the minimum post-mortem interval (i.e., the approximate time elapsed from death to discovery). For this insect evidence to be of value, however, it must be properly collected, preserved, and identified. As the only practicing forensic entomologist in Georgia, I will explain the basic techniques my lab uses to date human remains. I will then outline some basic experiments conducted in my lab, using animal models, and explain how this information is vital for understanding death scenes. I will then present the results of an actual case conducted with local law enforcement personnel in southeast Georgia. In sum, this talk will provide a better understanding of the field of forensic entomology, the knowledge of how forensic entomologists assess, collect, and interpret insect evidence, and insight into the services an entomologist can provide in forensic investigations.

Keywords

Forensics, Death scene, Entomology, Post-mortem interval

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 5:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Insects and Death: Forensic Entomology in Georgia

Room 2904 B

After 72 hours, entomological evidence from a death scene is the most accurate method for determining the minimum post-mortem interval (i.e., the approximate time elapsed from death to discovery). For this insect evidence to be of value, however, it must be properly collected, preserved, and identified. As the only practicing forensic entomologist in Georgia, I will explain the basic techniques my lab uses to date human remains. I will then outline some basic experiments conducted in my lab, using animal models, and explain how this information is vital for understanding death scenes. I will then present the results of an actual case conducted with local law enforcement personnel in southeast Georgia. In sum, this talk will provide a better understanding of the field of forensic entomology, the knowledge of how forensic entomologists assess, collect, and interpret insect evidence, and insight into the services an entomologist can provide in forensic investigations.