Presentation Title

Cloud-Computing Based Real-time Dynamic Spectrum Access for Internet-of-Things: A Testbed

Location

Room 2903

Session Format

Paper Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Engineering and Material Sciences - Electrical

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Nimish Sharma, Swetha Reddy, Robin Grodi and Danda B Rawat

Department of Electrical Engineering, Georgia Southern University, USA

Abstract

There has been exponential growth in the field of technology which has provisioned many devices to connect to the internet. Massive research has been done in the field of wireless technology to allow any devices, even a coffee machine to connect to the internet using wireless technology. Smart televisions, smart phones, smart security systems are all connected to the internet using wireless technology. However, many are oblivious to the fact that the wireless technology has limited power and bandwidth. If there are billions of devices currently relying on wireless to connect to the internet of things, then by the end of 2020 there will be tens, if not hundreds of billions of devices connected to the internet. This will undoubtedly create wireless data traffic to succumb to connectivity request and eventually collapse. In order to prevent conventional technology from exhaustion and underperformance, cognitive radio technology is proposed that will allow these wireless technology devices to maintain connectivity and provide reliable communication using shared spectrum. Currently, different wireless technology such as TV services, radar system, FM/AM radio stations, cellular systems, global positioning satellite technology and home routers, all use dedicated spectrum to establish and maintain connectivity. All these wireless services have limited bandwidth and can establish communication only with limited users. Dynamic spectrum access provides methods to liberate these technologies from the shackles of dedicated spectrum and enables multiple primary and secondary users to share the spectrum whether licensed or unlicensed depending on the volume of connection requests. Hence, any smart devices in the future can have access to the internet using shared spectrum dynamically. Our research funded through the National Science Foundation Grant [CNS: 1405670] engulfs not just the methods of creation of smart devices, but also explores the efficiency involved. In this presentation, we present a testbed for dynamic spectrum access for Internet-of-Things developed in “Cyber-security, Wireless System and Networking Innovations Lab” in Department of Electrical Engineering at GSU. Relying on global positioning system to define the users’ position, spectrum can be negotiated with the spectrum broker located in the cloud to assign and provide respective spectrum, thus preventing massive data traffic congestion and collision. The developed testbed can be used to test protocols and schemes needed for future wireless networks that support reliable seamless connectivity for mobile wireless users.

Keywords

Dynamic RF spectrum access, Cognitive network, Cloud assisted wireless spectrum access

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 5:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 4:00 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Cloud-Computing Based Real-time Dynamic Spectrum Access for Internet-of-Things: A Testbed

Room 2903

There has been exponential growth in the field of technology which has provisioned many devices to connect to the internet. Massive research has been done in the field of wireless technology to allow any devices, even a coffee machine to connect to the internet using wireless technology. Smart televisions, smart phones, smart security systems are all connected to the internet using wireless technology. However, many are oblivious to the fact that the wireless technology has limited power and bandwidth. If there are billions of devices currently relying on wireless to connect to the internet of things, then by the end of 2020 there will be tens, if not hundreds of billions of devices connected to the internet. This will undoubtedly create wireless data traffic to succumb to connectivity request and eventually collapse. In order to prevent conventional technology from exhaustion and underperformance, cognitive radio technology is proposed that will allow these wireless technology devices to maintain connectivity and provide reliable communication using shared spectrum. Currently, different wireless technology such as TV services, radar system, FM/AM radio stations, cellular systems, global positioning satellite technology and home routers, all use dedicated spectrum to establish and maintain connectivity. All these wireless services have limited bandwidth and can establish communication only with limited users. Dynamic spectrum access provides methods to liberate these technologies from the shackles of dedicated spectrum and enables multiple primary and secondary users to share the spectrum whether licensed or unlicensed depending on the volume of connection requests. Hence, any smart devices in the future can have access to the internet using shared spectrum dynamically. Our research funded through the National Science Foundation Grant [CNS: 1405670] engulfs not just the methods of creation of smart devices, but also explores the efficiency involved. In this presentation, we present a testbed for dynamic spectrum access for Internet-of-Things developed in “Cyber-security, Wireless System and Networking Innovations Lab” in Department of Electrical Engineering at GSU. Relying on global positioning system to define the users’ position, spectrum can be negotiated with the spectrum broker located in the cloud to assign and provide respective spectrum, thus preventing massive data traffic congestion and collision. The developed testbed can be used to test protocols and schemes needed for future wireless networks that support reliable seamless connectivity for mobile wireless users.