Presentation Title

Cholelithiasis Prevalence in Minority Women within the United States

Location

Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Public Health & Well Being - Epidemiologic Research

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Faculty Advisor: Claire Robb, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Abstract

Objective: Cholelithiasis affects 15% of adults in developed societies, which approximates to 20 million Americans annually. Women, including those of minority populations with poor diets and health issues are more likely to suffer from cholelithiasis in their lifetime. The purpose of this study is to highlight the need for updated information concerning cholelithiasis data in the United States.

Methods: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 1988-1994 of 20,003 individuals ages 17 years and older was used to calculate logistic regression and odds ratio (OR) of cholelithiasis occurrence among interviewed men and women who reported a history of gallbladder issues.

Results: When compared across race/ethnicity and gender, women are twice as likely to receive cholelithiasis diagnosis from a doctor (1.05% of males vs. 4.00% of females). As well as receive non-surgical treatment for cholelithiasis as men (18.35% Non-Hispanic White men vs. 48.71% of Non-Hispanic White women; 4.42% of Non-Hispanic Black men vs. 17.98% of Non-Hispanic Black women; 1.99% of Mexican American males vs. 5.34% of Mexican American females.) Women are also more likely to receive surgery as treatment compared to men (18% Non-Hispanic White men vs. 61.61%% of Non-Hispanic White women, 0.93% of Non-Hispanic Black men vs. 6.87& of Non-Hispanic Black women, 0.81% of Mexican American males vs. 4.87% of Mexican American females. Age is not a significant factor (0.750, C.I: 0.306-1.841).

Limitations: Missing/unreadable data lead to selection bias of surveyed participants. Data is not reflective of momentary rates of cholelithiasis prevalence and incidence.

Conclusions: Women are more likely to experience cholelithiasis and receive surgery and other forms of treatment than men. Updated surveillance is needed to determine modern prevalence and incidence rates as well as provide support to the information displayed above.

Keywords: Cholelithiasis, females, males

Keywords

Cholelithiasis

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 2:45 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 4:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 2:45 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Cholelithiasis Prevalence in Minority Women within the United States

Atrium

Objective: Cholelithiasis affects 15% of adults in developed societies, which approximates to 20 million Americans annually. Women, including those of minority populations with poor diets and health issues are more likely to suffer from cholelithiasis in their lifetime. The purpose of this study is to highlight the need for updated information concerning cholelithiasis data in the United States.

Methods: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data from 1988-1994 of 20,003 individuals ages 17 years and older was used to calculate logistic regression and odds ratio (OR) of cholelithiasis occurrence among interviewed men and women who reported a history of gallbladder issues.

Results: When compared across race/ethnicity and gender, women are twice as likely to receive cholelithiasis diagnosis from a doctor (1.05% of males vs. 4.00% of females). As well as receive non-surgical treatment for cholelithiasis as men (18.35% Non-Hispanic White men vs. 48.71% of Non-Hispanic White women; 4.42% of Non-Hispanic Black men vs. 17.98% of Non-Hispanic Black women; 1.99% of Mexican American males vs. 5.34% of Mexican American females.) Women are also more likely to receive surgery as treatment compared to men (18% Non-Hispanic White men vs. 61.61%% of Non-Hispanic White women, 0.93% of Non-Hispanic Black men vs. 6.87& of Non-Hispanic Black women, 0.81% of Mexican American males vs. 4.87% of Mexican American females. Age is not a significant factor (0.750, C.I: 0.306-1.841).

Limitations: Missing/unreadable data lead to selection bias of surveyed participants. Data is not reflective of momentary rates of cholelithiasis prevalence and incidence.

Conclusions: Women are more likely to experience cholelithiasis and receive surgery and other forms of treatment than men. Updated surveillance is needed to determine modern prevalence and incidence rates as well as provide support to the information displayed above.

Keywords: Cholelithiasis, females, males