Presentation Title

Incidence of Hyponatremia in the Adult, Inpatient Setting: Towards an Improved Falls Risk Assessment Tool

Location

Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Public Health & Well Being - Community & Practice-based Research

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Melissa Garno, EdD, RN; Rose Mary Gee, PhD, RN; Christy Dubert, PhD, RN

Abstract

Purpose: This project aimed to examine the occurrence of and potential epidemiologic association between the existence of serum hyponatremia and adult inpatient falls in the hospital setting. The results were to create a revised risk assessment tool that has the potential to be applied across acute care settings. Additionally, data from this first stage of inquiry will be utilized to stimulate future, in-depth studies to determine if a positive correlation exists.

Conceptual Framework: Iowa Model

Methodology: The design for this project was a non-experimental, clinical observation study utilizing retrospective chart review (RCR). Comparison statistical analysis was limited, by intention, as a non-fall group was not used for this first phase study. There were no validated instruments for this subject. The RCR reviewed the records of adult inpatients with a fall reported via an online variance reporting system from June 2011 to December 2013. Approval was obtained applicable Institutional Review Boards.

Findings: The findings of this project support the hypothesis that serum hyponatremia may be a viable and treatable risk factor for predicting falls. Data supported the hypothesis and validated the need for a closer look at the epidemiological association between patients with low sodium levels and falls.

Implications for Healthcare practice: Incorporation of hyponatremia awareness and intervention into a widely accepted FRAT, with validation testing, may decrease falls, decrease direct and indirect costs associated with falls and improve the quality of life for those that fall. This preliminary information has led to the creation of a revised and more-inclusive FRAT for healthcare providers. This data may serve as a catalyst for risk identification and intrinsic risk modification. Stronger evidence is needed and should stimulate future studies.

Keywords

Hyponatremia, Fall risk, Risk, Adult, Inpatient, FRAT, Sodium, Healthcare, Nursing

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 2:45 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 4:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 2:45 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Incidence of Hyponatremia in the Adult, Inpatient Setting: Towards an Improved Falls Risk Assessment Tool

Atrium

Purpose: This project aimed to examine the occurrence of and potential epidemiologic association between the existence of serum hyponatremia and adult inpatient falls in the hospital setting. The results were to create a revised risk assessment tool that has the potential to be applied across acute care settings. Additionally, data from this first stage of inquiry will be utilized to stimulate future, in-depth studies to determine if a positive correlation exists.

Conceptual Framework: Iowa Model

Methodology: The design for this project was a non-experimental, clinical observation study utilizing retrospective chart review (RCR). Comparison statistical analysis was limited, by intention, as a non-fall group was not used for this first phase study. There were no validated instruments for this subject. The RCR reviewed the records of adult inpatients with a fall reported via an online variance reporting system from June 2011 to December 2013. Approval was obtained applicable Institutional Review Boards.

Findings: The findings of this project support the hypothesis that serum hyponatremia may be a viable and treatable risk factor for predicting falls. Data supported the hypothesis and validated the need for a closer look at the epidemiological association between patients with low sodium levels and falls.

Implications for Healthcare practice: Incorporation of hyponatremia awareness and intervention into a widely accepted FRAT, with validation testing, may decrease falls, decrease direct and indirect costs associated with falls and improve the quality of life for those that fall. This preliminary information has led to the creation of a revised and more-inclusive FRAT for healthcare providers. This data may serve as a catalyst for risk identification and intrinsic risk modification. Stronger evidence is needed and should stimulate future studies.