Presentation Title

Benefits of Yoga in Schools

Location

Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Education & Learning - Teaching, Learning & Human Development

Abstract

Yoga is an ancient practice originating in India, rooted in spirituality and meditation. Traditional Hindus and gurus believe yoga helps gain profound awareness into the nature of existence. Although it is still widely known for its spiritual benefits, modern day yoga in Western culture has transformed. The variations of practices in the West primarily focus on physical postures or “asanas” and has become another form of exercise. Whether or not a yogi initially intends to benefit spiritually from their practice, the focus required in holding a pose is meditative. Therefore, spirituality and meditation are both inevitable byproducts of this discipline. There are a wide variety of different types of yoga today, but they all share the same goal, to improve an individual’s overall health. Yoga has also shown to improve cognitive and emotional stability, treating depression, anxiety, and anger control (Conboy, Noggle, Frey, Kudesia, & Khalsa, 2013). Over the last couple decades, yoga has become an extremely popular practice in the United States, with roughly 16 million Americans practicing every year (White, 2011). There is now a rapidly growing interest from children and teenagers to practice yoga. This project will present a review of several studies on the benefits of yoga and argue why children and adolescents should have access to the practice in school. There have been several studies illustrating how yoga promotes physical, emotional, social, and cognitive benefits; therefore, beginning this practice as early as possible could cultivate such mental and behavioral health in the formative stages of life. This could consequently help prevent many of the common physical and mental health problems in adults today. It has been said, “It is easier to build a child, than to repair an adult”. By beginning the discipline of yoga at a young age, a child can develop healthy habits for coping with the stresses of life. Research indicates those who practice yoga regularly are often rewarded with life skills which may have otherwise been unattainable.

Keywords

Yoga, School, Review of studies, Children, Adolescents

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 2:45 PM

End Date

4-24-2015 4:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 2:45 PM Apr 24th, 4:00 PM

Benefits of Yoga in Schools

Atrium

Yoga is an ancient practice originating in India, rooted in spirituality and meditation. Traditional Hindus and gurus believe yoga helps gain profound awareness into the nature of existence. Although it is still widely known for its spiritual benefits, modern day yoga in Western culture has transformed. The variations of practices in the West primarily focus on physical postures or “asanas” and has become another form of exercise. Whether or not a yogi initially intends to benefit spiritually from their practice, the focus required in holding a pose is meditative. Therefore, spirituality and meditation are both inevitable byproducts of this discipline. There are a wide variety of different types of yoga today, but they all share the same goal, to improve an individual’s overall health. Yoga has also shown to improve cognitive and emotional stability, treating depression, anxiety, and anger control (Conboy, Noggle, Frey, Kudesia, & Khalsa, 2013). Over the last couple decades, yoga has become an extremely popular practice in the United States, with roughly 16 million Americans practicing every year (White, 2011). There is now a rapidly growing interest from children and teenagers to practice yoga. This project will present a review of several studies on the benefits of yoga and argue why children and adolescents should have access to the practice in school. There have been several studies illustrating how yoga promotes physical, emotional, social, and cognitive benefits; therefore, beginning this practice as early as possible could cultivate such mental and behavioral health in the formative stages of life. This could consequently help prevent many of the common physical and mental health problems in adults today. It has been said, “It is easier to build a child, than to repair an adult”. By beginning the discipline of yoga at a young age, a child can develop healthy habits for coping with the stresses of life. Research indicates those who practice yoga regularly are often rewarded with life skills which may have otherwise been unattainable.