Honors College Theses

Date

2019

Major

Exercise Science (B.S.)

Document Type and Release Option

Thesis (open access)

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Daniel Czech

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to determine if there were different effects on the range of motion and muscle contraction force in the plantar flexors of the ankle when implementing vibrating foam roller treatment in comparison to static. The study included 15 female swimmers within the age range of 18 to 28 years old without neuromusculoskelatal pathology within the last six months. Each testing session consisted of four conditions, conditions A and B were static rollers and conditions C and D were vibrating rollers. To ensure reliability the order of the conditions was randomly selected and resting flexibility and force production were measured after the resting period in between conditions. The participants began by using their assigned roller for thirty seconds, three times, with fifteen second breaks. Range of motion was measured by a weight-bearing lunge and a tape measure and force was measured by the Biodex using isokinetic and isometric tests. As hypothesized, after using a two-way ANOVA test with repeated measures and a paired T-test for the difference of the difference, there were no significant interactions based on Cohen's D calculations and no significant difference between pre and post results on torque production, but both rollers had a significant enhancement on range of motion.

Thesis Summary

The purpose of this research was to determine if there were different effects on the range of motion and muscle contraction force in the plantar flexors of the ankle when implementing vibrating foam roller treatment in comparison to static. Fifteen female swimmers volunteered. No significant difference between pre and post results on torque production, but both rollers had a significant enhancement on range of motion

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