Date

2019

Major

Athletic Training (B.S.)

Document Type and Release Option

Thesis (open access)

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Stephen Rossi

Abstract

Basketball season occurs over several months and involves heavy traveling, training, competing, and scholarly duties. These demands do not allow much time for rest and recovery. A lack in the quantity and quality of sleep can reduce the ability to manage stress and reduce recovery from training and competition. This can affect the health and well-being of the athlete and their success on the court. In college, sleep schedules may change from high school by staying up later and sleeping in more. College students typically sleep between six and seven hours a night which is less than the recommended nine hours (Eaton, 2007). The question appears to be whether a lack of sleep influences perceived exertion during training, competition and performance. There have been many studies examining the relationship between sleep hygiene and illness but less on performance (Damien, 2007). Twelve female basketball athletes recorded the number of hours of sleep, RPE following practice, and scoring percentage every day for six weeks. Statistical analysis was conducted to note difference in RPE, sleep, and scoring percentage. There was no significant difference in all variables across the six weeks of the in-season.

Thesis Summary

Basketball season occurs over several months and allows for little recovery time for athletes. College athletes typically do not receive the proper amount of sleep which is believed to hinder their recovery process and affect their health as well as their success on the court. Statistical analysis was conducted to note difference in RPE, sleep, and scoring percentage. There was no significant difference in all variables across the six weeks of the in-season.

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