Proposal Title

Mentorship Award Winners in Counseling: How Can We Learn From Their Experience?

Location

Higher Education: Assessment and Well-Being - Preston 2

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

In many fields, the topic of mentorship is one of importance. In the counseling profession, mentorship is imperative for helping peers in the areas of research, teaching, service, career, and social aspects. We studied 20 individuals in the field who have won mentorship awards, comparing their experiences and expertise with guidelines for mentorship from a national organization, and counseling researchers. The results can help anyone interested in mentorship improve current practice and see what literature has left out!

Keywords

mentorship, counseling, research

Professional Bio

Meredith Rausch, Ph.D., NCC received her undergraduate degree in Public Speaking and a master’s degree in Community Counseling, both from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. She then pursued a certificate in improvisational comedy from The Second City in Chicago. During her doctoral studies, Meredith worked with Veterans, performing neuropsychological assessments, writing marriage and career programs for the military, and as an on-call crisis counselor. She obtained her Ph.D. from The University of Iowa and is currently an assistant professor at Augusta University.

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Oct 4th, 1:45 PM Oct 4th, 3:30 PM

Mentorship Award Winners in Counseling: How Can We Learn From Their Experience?

Higher Education: Assessment and Well-Being - Preston 2

In many fields, the topic of mentorship is one of importance. In the counseling profession, mentorship is imperative for helping peers in the areas of research, teaching, service, career, and social aspects. We studied 20 individuals in the field who have won mentorship awards, comparing their experiences and expertise with guidelines for mentorship from a national organization, and counseling researchers. The results can help anyone interested in mentorship improve current practice and see what literature has left out!