Proposal Title

Science Curriculum, Conversations, and Henrietta Lacks

Location

Moody

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

This work is a theoretical inquiry into alternative pedagogies that challenge current standardized practices in the field of science education. Building upon a wide array of work, such as philosophy and history of science (Haraway, 1989, 1991,1997; Harding 1991, 1998; Latour, 1987, 1991/1993; Rheinberger, 1992, 2010; Serres, 1982/2007,1991/1997, 2010/2012), curriculum studies and science curriculum (Appelbaum, 2001, 2010; Barone, 1990, 2000; Blades, 1997, 2001; Calabrese-Barton, 2003, 2011; Cartwright, 1999; Doll, 1993; Grumet, 1999; He, 2003,2008, 2009,2013; Lather, 1997,2007,2010; Schubert, 1986, 2009; Schwab, 1978; Weaver, 2001, 2004, 2010, 2015); and playwriting (Brody, 2011; and Mighton, 1987, 1988), I explore how the stories of Henrietta Lacks become part of a conspiracy to change science education. Conversations directly involving Henrietta Lacks were inspired by the writings of Hannah Landecker (1999, 2000, 2007), Rebecca Skloot (2010), and Priscilla Wald (2012a, 2012b).

I create imaginary dialogues which serve as the theoretical framework for each chapter. Each chapter unfolds in a form of a play with imaginary settings and events that bring Henrietta Lacks back from the grave to participate in conversations about science, society and social justice. Through my inquiry, I call for a multidimensional science curriculum that contests a linear standardized science curriculum, builds upon philosophy of science and history of science, and acts upon social justice through the telling and sharing of the story of Henrietta Lacks.

Keywords

Henrietta Lacks, play, science education, curriculum studies, science curriculum, social justice

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Oct 7th, 3:15 PM Oct 7th, 4:30 PM

Science Curriculum, Conversations, and Henrietta Lacks

Moody

This work is a theoretical inquiry into alternative pedagogies that challenge current standardized practices in the field of science education. Building upon a wide array of work, such as philosophy and history of science (Haraway, 1989, 1991,1997; Harding 1991, 1998; Latour, 1987, 1991/1993; Rheinberger, 1992, 2010; Serres, 1982/2007,1991/1997, 2010/2012), curriculum studies and science curriculum (Appelbaum, 2001, 2010; Barone, 1990, 2000; Blades, 1997, 2001; Calabrese-Barton, 2003, 2011; Cartwright, 1999; Doll, 1993; Grumet, 1999; He, 2003,2008, 2009,2013; Lather, 1997,2007,2010; Schubert, 1986, 2009; Schwab, 1978; Weaver, 2001, 2004, 2010, 2015); and playwriting (Brody, 2011; and Mighton, 1987, 1988), I explore how the stories of Henrietta Lacks become part of a conspiracy to change science education. Conversations directly involving Henrietta Lacks were inspired by the writings of Hannah Landecker (1999, 2000, 2007), Rebecca Skloot (2010), and Priscilla Wald (2012a, 2012b).

I create imaginary dialogues which serve as the theoretical framework for each chapter. Each chapter unfolds in a form of a play with imaginary settings and events that bring Henrietta Lacks back from the grave to participate in conversations about science, society and social justice. Through my inquiry, I call for a multidimensional science curriculum that contests a linear standardized science curriculum, builds upon philosophy of science and history of science, and acts upon social justice through the telling and sharing of the story of Henrietta Lacks.