Proposal Title

Teacher Perceptions of the Use of Differentiated Instruction on Student Learning Outcomes in High School Social Studies

Location

Moody

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

In an era of high-stakes testing and accountability, some question the impact of such measures on teacher practice and instruction. These concerns are heightened by recent reform efforts regarding next generation standards, teacher evaluation, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and edTPA. Some research suggests teacher practice and curriculum are shaped by high-stakes testing. However, if teacher practice and curriculum are shaped by high-stakes testing, subjects such as social studies may be marginalized at elementary- and middle-school levels as teachers focus instruction on mathematics and English language arts, given the extent to which the latter subjects are tested. Therefore, high school social studies teachers may find students lacking requisite content and skills essential for secondary level instruction. However, high school social studies teachers are tasked with addressing these potential instructional gaps and promoting democracy and effective citizenship that prepares students for the 21st century. Thus, high school social studies teachers may find increased significance in utilizing research-based instructional best-practices to address such challenges. Therefore, this qualitative study, utilizing constructivism at its theoretical framework, examines high school social studies teachers’ perceptions of the use of differentiated instruction to promote student learning outcomes, and includes methods, results, discussion, and recommendations. (Completed Research Project)

Keywords

Curriculum, Instruction, Best Practices, Social Studies Education, Qualitative Research

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Oct 7th, 10:30 AM Oct 7th, 12:00 PM

Teacher Perceptions of the Use of Differentiated Instruction on Student Learning Outcomes in High School Social Studies

Moody

In an era of high-stakes testing and accountability, some question the impact of such measures on teacher practice and instruction. These concerns are heightened by recent reform efforts regarding next generation standards, teacher evaluation, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and edTPA. Some research suggests teacher practice and curriculum are shaped by high-stakes testing. However, if teacher practice and curriculum are shaped by high-stakes testing, subjects such as social studies may be marginalized at elementary- and middle-school levels as teachers focus instruction on mathematics and English language arts, given the extent to which the latter subjects are tested. Therefore, high school social studies teachers may find students lacking requisite content and skills essential for secondary level instruction. However, high school social studies teachers are tasked with addressing these potential instructional gaps and promoting democracy and effective citizenship that prepares students for the 21st century. Thus, high school social studies teachers may find increased significance in utilizing research-based instructional best-practices to address such challenges. Therefore, this qualitative study, utilizing constructivism at its theoretical framework, examines high school social studies teachers’ perceptions of the use of differentiated instruction to promote student learning outcomes, and includes methods, results, discussion, and recommendations. (Completed Research Project)