Proposal Title

Thematic Teaching V.S. Textbook Approach: Effect on Motivation and Learning of Elementary Students

Location

Moody

Proposal Track

Practice Report

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of thematic teaching method versus subject-based textbook approach on student motivation and achievement of third grade students. This action research project was conducted using mixed methods in a third-grade classroom. Over a period of six weeks, all 18 students in the class were taught using the thematic method integrating reading and math around a literature unit for three weeks, and then using the school-adopted textbooks for reading and math for three weeks. The students were observed, pre- and post-tested in reading and math, and surveyed to determine the effects of thematic teaching and textbook approach on their motivation, engagement, and achievement in reading and math. These students were assessed using the same standards for reading and math and the results were compared. The results indicate that student motivation increased when using the thematic method versus the textbook approach and that the number of students that scored a seventy percent or higher in reading and math also increased. It suggests that the thematic method is more effective than the textbook approach and that educators should teach using the thematic method in order to increase student motivation, engagement, and achievement.

Keywords

Thematic Teaching, Motivation, Academic Achievement, Elementary School

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Oct 7th, 10:30 AM Oct 7th, 12:00 PM

Thematic Teaching V.S. Textbook Approach: Effect on Motivation and Learning of Elementary Students

Moody

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of thematic teaching method versus subject-based textbook approach on student motivation and achievement of third grade students. This action research project was conducted using mixed methods in a third-grade classroom. Over a period of six weeks, all 18 students in the class were taught using the thematic method integrating reading and math around a literature unit for three weeks, and then using the school-adopted textbooks for reading and math for three weeks. The students were observed, pre- and post-tested in reading and math, and surveyed to determine the effects of thematic teaching and textbook approach on their motivation, engagement, and achievement in reading and math. These students were assessed using the same standards for reading and math and the results were compared. The results indicate that student motivation increased when using the thematic method versus the textbook approach and that the number of students that scored a seventy percent or higher in reading and math also increased. It suggests that the thematic method is more effective than the textbook approach and that educators should teach using the thematic method in order to increase student motivation, engagement, and achievement.