Proposal Title

From Boys to Men: the Influence of Commercialized Hip-hop on the Adoption of Alternative Forms of Masculinity by Black Male Adolescents

Location

Hamilton A

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Symposium

Abstract

Several studies have demonstrated the effects of multiple social determinants on how young black men learn to develop masculine identities (Hammond & Mattis, 2005; Hunter & Davis, 1994), yet a relatively small number of these studies have provided qualitative data relating to the social influences on masculinity development of males outside of inner city environments. Furthermore, the majority of those studies represent young black men as a monolithic group and focus primarily on hypermasculinity and criminality (Douglas & Bowles, 2013; Oliver, 1996; Oware, 2010). Guided by possible selves theory (Markus & Nurious, 1986), and influenced by Cross’ theory of nigrescense, as well as John Ogbu’s cultural ecological theory and the burden of acting white, my research explores how masculine identities are conceptualized and negotiated among black male adolescents of diverse socioeconomic backgrounds and to what extent hip-hop has on the development of these identities.

This research is ongoing and will be used to satisfy my dissertation requirement at Georgia Southern University.

Keywords

Hip-hop, masculinity, possible selves theory

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From Boys to Men: the Influence of Commercialized Hip-hop on the Adoption of Alternative Forms of Masculinity by Black Male Adolescents

Hamilton A

Several studies have demonstrated the effects of multiple social determinants on how young black men learn to develop masculine identities (Hammond & Mattis, 2005; Hunter & Davis, 1994), yet a relatively small number of these studies have provided qualitative data relating to the social influences on masculinity development of males outside of inner city environments. Furthermore, the majority of those studies represent young black men as a monolithic group and focus primarily on hypermasculinity and criminality (Douglas & Bowles, 2013; Oliver, 1996; Oware, 2010). Guided by possible selves theory (Markus & Nurious, 1986), and influenced by Cross’ theory of nigrescense, as well as John Ogbu’s cultural ecological theory and the burden of acting white, my research explores how masculine identities are conceptualized and negotiated among black male adolescents of diverse socioeconomic backgrounds and to what extent hip-hop has on the development of these identities.

This research is ongoing and will be used to satisfy my dissertation requirement at Georgia Southern University.