Proposal Title

The Expectancy-Value Theory and Underrepresented Adolescents' Attitudes Toward STEM

Location

Walsh A

Proposal Track

Practice Report

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

Scientists are trained in the coordination of evidence and claims, whereas non-scientists may struggle with or not value this skill (Ford, 2012). Prior work has examined adolescents’ abilities to coordinate evidence and claims (Kuhn et al., 2008). Research also has investigated adolescents’ attitudes toward STEM (Andersen & Ward, 2014; Duran et al., 2014; Lewis & Connell, 2005). The current practice report considers the possible intersections of these two areas of research with particular attention paid to underrepresented low SES minority youth. Such emphasis is important given the National Research Council mandates to address gaps in the pipeline from the classroom to STEM careers (2011), and a persistent failure to retain low SES African American students in STEM (Hernandez, et al., 2013). Our work is guided by the expectancy-value framework, which relates behavior and academic achievement to expectancy for success and the perceived value of a task (Wigfield & Eccles, 2000). We will review existing literature to investigate 1) general adolescent student attitudes toward STEM, and 2) factors that may influence or relate to how low SES African American students value reasoning and evidence when making claims. Future studies and practice guidelines to evaluate interventions and scaffold the components of scientific reasoning are discussed.

Keywords

reasoning, scientific reasoning, STEM education, science education, science

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Oct 7th, 1:45 PM Oct 7th, 3:00 PM

The Expectancy-Value Theory and Underrepresented Adolescents' Attitudes Toward STEM

Walsh A

Scientists are trained in the coordination of evidence and claims, whereas non-scientists may struggle with or not value this skill (Ford, 2012). Prior work has examined adolescents’ abilities to coordinate evidence and claims (Kuhn et al., 2008). Research also has investigated adolescents’ attitudes toward STEM (Andersen & Ward, 2014; Duran et al., 2014; Lewis & Connell, 2005). The current practice report considers the possible intersections of these two areas of research with particular attention paid to underrepresented low SES minority youth. Such emphasis is important given the National Research Council mandates to address gaps in the pipeline from the classroom to STEM careers (2011), and a persistent failure to retain low SES African American students in STEM (Hernandez, et al., 2013). Our work is guided by the expectancy-value framework, which relates behavior and academic achievement to expectancy for success and the perceived value of a task (Wigfield & Eccles, 2000). We will review existing literature to investigate 1) general adolescent student attitudes toward STEM, and 2) factors that may influence or relate to how low SES African American students value reasoning and evidence when making claims. Future studies and practice guidelines to evaluate interventions and scaffold the components of scientific reasoning are discussed.