Proposal Title

Intra-District Student Mobility, School Discipline and Gender: Evidence from Clark County, Nevada

Presenter Information

Richard Welsh, UGAFollow

Location

Hamilton B

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

Student mobility, or the movement of students across schools, is a widespread phenomenon in the U.S. School discipline provides an important example of school policies and practices that may induce student mobility. Student mobility and school discipline are two prominent challenges in urban school districts. The interaction of gender with school discipline in shaping patterns of student mobility has received little attention. This paper examines student mobility patterns across gender and the timing of school changes in Clark County, Nevada. In particular, using student-level data from 2007-08 through to 2012-13, this study compares the exit patterns and examines the destination schools of male and female mobile students categorized by the timing of non-structural school changes and discipline-related mobility. The findings draw attention to discipline-related mobility or the placement of students in alternative schools, especially during the school year. Male students are more likely to switch schools mid-year than female students and the disproportionate rates of student mobility between male and female students can be explained by disciplinary incidents. Gender is a significant predictor of the destination school quality of discipline-related movers. Policy implications and areas for future research are discussed.

Keywords

student mobility, school discipline, educational equity

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Oct 7th, 10:30 AM Oct 7th, 12:00 PM

Intra-District Student Mobility, School Discipline and Gender: Evidence from Clark County, Nevada

Hamilton B

Student mobility, or the movement of students across schools, is a widespread phenomenon in the U.S. School discipline provides an important example of school policies and practices that may induce student mobility. Student mobility and school discipline are two prominent challenges in urban school districts. The interaction of gender with school discipline in shaping patterns of student mobility has received little attention. This paper examines student mobility patterns across gender and the timing of school changes in Clark County, Nevada. In particular, using student-level data from 2007-08 through to 2012-13, this study compares the exit patterns and examines the destination schools of male and female mobile students categorized by the timing of non-structural school changes and discipline-related mobility. The findings draw attention to discipline-related mobility or the placement of students in alternative schools, especially during the school year. Male students are more likely to switch schools mid-year than female students and the disproportionate rates of student mobility between male and female students can be explained by disciplinary incidents. Gender is a significant predictor of the destination school quality of discipline-related movers. Policy implications and areas for future research are discussed.