Proposal Title

The Consequences and Affordances of Neoclassicism and the GPS Economics Curriculum

Location

Moody

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

In this study, I investigated the terrain of economics education curriculum and standards in general, and the state of Georgia specifically. Economics is most often considered in terms solely of the exchange of money and the making of profits. However, little in the research literature sheds light on the ways in which peoples experience of economics connects to the economics curriculum as it is presented in national and state standards. The ways in which current social theories consider the economy through terms like neoliberalism and commodification is not considered in the standards documents. However, I theorized economics curriculum, as articulated through the Georgia Performance Standards for K-12, in terms of what kinds of human subjectivity it allows and constrains, in other words, how students who learn this economics curriculum might be shaped by it and for what ends. Thus, I looked deeply at the curriculum to consider the social impact of the economics curriculum and the mechanisms at work that fuel the economics curriculum. These are important investigations in light of social studies' call to help students make sense of their social worlds. My work interrogated economics' ability to answer this call in light of the social and economic upheavals in the last ten years.

Keywords

economics, social studies, curriculum, subjectivity

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Oct 7th, 3:15 PM Oct 7th, 4:30 PM

The Consequences and Affordances of Neoclassicism and the GPS Economics Curriculum

Moody

In this study, I investigated the terrain of economics education curriculum and standards in general, and the state of Georgia specifically. Economics is most often considered in terms solely of the exchange of money and the making of profits. However, little in the research literature sheds light on the ways in which peoples experience of economics connects to the economics curriculum as it is presented in national and state standards. The ways in which current social theories consider the economy through terms like neoliberalism and commodification is not considered in the standards documents. However, I theorized economics curriculum, as articulated through the Georgia Performance Standards for K-12, in terms of what kinds of human subjectivity it allows and constrains, in other words, how students who learn this economics curriculum might be shaped by it and for what ends. Thus, I looked deeply at the curriculum to consider the social impact of the economics curriculum and the mechanisms at work that fuel the economics curriculum. These are important investigations in light of social studies' call to help students make sense of their social worlds. My work interrogated economics' ability to answer this call in light of the social and economic upheavals in the last ten years.