Proposal Title

Reconstructing a Historical Principal Leadership Paradigm: An Exemplar of Student-Centered and Democratically Motivated Principal Leadership

Location

Walsh A

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

This year’s GERA theme of “Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies” is particularly relevant to my research on the leadership practices of Pre-Brown African American principals. Using qualitative methodology, the purpose of this systematic meta synthesis is to review and synthesize literature on pre-Brown African American principals’ beliefs, goals, and practices (Onwuegbuzie & Frels, 2016). To address the question, “How did pre-Brown African American principals define and deliver education?” Critical Race Theory (Leonardo, 2013; Dixon & Rousseau, 2006) and the Historical African American Pedagogical Model (Walker, 2009; Walker, 2013; Walker, 2015) provide the conceptual lens from which to analyze and construct this historical paradigm. This scholarship is significant because it establishes and constructs a moral and belief-driven leadership paradigm that mitigated systemic and inequitable opportunities for thousands of children of color. Further, pre-Brown school leaders used a this paradigm to prepare their students to enter and participate fully in a democratic society. In as much as children of color are subject to national and state-derived inequities, reconstructing this leadership paradigm has the potential to expand current leadership models and to effect more equitable and student-centered leadership paradigms designed to educate diverse democracies, particularly children of color.

Keywords

African American students, Principals, historical paradigms

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Oct 7th, 3:15 PM Oct 7th, 4:30 PM

Reconstructing a Historical Principal Leadership Paradigm: An Exemplar of Student-Centered and Democratically Motivated Principal Leadership

Walsh A

This year’s GERA theme of “Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies” is particularly relevant to my research on the leadership practices of Pre-Brown African American principals. Using qualitative methodology, the purpose of this systematic meta synthesis is to review and synthesize literature on pre-Brown African American principals’ beliefs, goals, and practices (Onwuegbuzie & Frels, 2016). To address the question, “How did pre-Brown African American principals define and deliver education?” Critical Race Theory (Leonardo, 2013; Dixon & Rousseau, 2006) and the Historical African American Pedagogical Model (Walker, 2009; Walker, 2013; Walker, 2015) provide the conceptual lens from which to analyze and construct this historical paradigm. This scholarship is significant because it establishes and constructs a moral and belief-driven leadership paradigm that mitigated systemic and inequitable opportunities for thousands of children of color. Further, pre-Brown school leaders used a this paradigm to prepare their students to enter and participate fully in a democratic society. In as much as children of color are subject to national and state-derived inequities, reconstructing this leadership paradigm has the potential to expand current leadership models and to effect more equitable and student-centered leadership paradigms designed to educate diverse democracies, particularly children of color.