Proposal Title

STEMing the Tide: Culturally-Responsive Practices for STEM Kindergarten Readiness in African-American Early Learners

Location

Walsh A

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

This research project investigates Kindergarten readiness among African-American early learners in the critical STEM areas of math and science. The key research question of the study —does participation in a STEM-based summer enrichment program lead to increased math and science readiness for African-American Kindergarteners?—is examined by comparing pre/posttest scores during the summer program and triangulating this data with first quarter progress reports obtained in the Kindergarten school year. Results indicate that although few participants were deemed ‘proficient’ on posttests administered in the summer program, all participants met or exceeded math and science standards on their first Kindergarten progress report. Participants’ success in meeting (or exceeding) math and science standards may be attributed to the use of culturally-relevant practices for teaching STEM to African-American early learners, which include song, visual and verbal expression, and multi-sensory instruction. This presentation will feature objectves and outcomes from a completed research project.

Keywords

STEM early learners, STEM Pre-K, African-American STEM learning, STEM culturally-responsive teaching

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Oct 7th, 1:45 PM Oct 7th, 3:00 PM

STEMing the Tide: Culturally-Responsive Practices for STEM Kindergarten Readiness in African-American Early Learners

Walsh A

This research project investigates Kindergarten readiness among African-American early learners in the critical STEM areas of math and science. The key research question of the study —does participation in a STEM-based summer enrichment program lead to increased math and science readiness for African-American Kindergarteners?—is examined by comparing pre/posttest scores during the summer program and triangulating this data with first quarter progress reports obtained in the Kindergarten school year. Results indicate that although few participants were deemed ‘proficient’ on posttests administered in the summer program, all participants met or exceeded math and science standards on their first Kindergarten progress report. Participants’ success in meeting (or exceeding) math and science standards may be attributed to the use of culturally-relevant practices for teaching STEM to African-American early learners, which include song, visual and verbal expression, and multi-sensory instruction. This presentation will feature objectves and outcomes from a completed research project.