Proposal Title

The Manifestation of the African-centered Curriculum in the Pedagogical Practices of Teachers in an African–centered School during Science Instruction

Location

Hamilton A

Proposal Track

Research Project

Session Format

Presentation

Abstract

Effective and authentic educational solutions for African American students include pedagogical practices that recognize students’ socio-cultural identity as a vital element in the learning process. It is the case, however, that the genuine infusion of African American students’ culture is not evident in all classrooms, or in all disciplines. While the causes are many—and undoubtedly complex—many educators’ misunderstanding of how to effectively utilize student identity to the benefit of student learning constitute a large part of the problem. Furthermore, science, traditionally characterized as neutral and void of cultural influence, is an even more difficult subject for teachers merge with students’ home lives and their communities. This study argues that one formidable remedy can be found in providing more literature and references for pedagogical practices centered on African American students’ social, cultural and political identities as an oppressed group in society. This presentation will be of a proposed study that will utilize the qualitative case study methodology to describe the ways in which the African-centered curriculum, as informed by the Afrocentric educational philosophy, is translated into practice by teachers during science instruction in an African-centered school.

Keywords

African-centered schools, science education, pedagogical practices, Afrocentric educational philosophy, culturally relevant pedagogy

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Oct 7th, 9:00 AM Oct 7th, 10:15 AM

The Manifestation of the African-centered Curriculum in the Pedagogical Practices of Teachers in an African–centered School during Science Instruction

Hamilton A

Effective and authentic educational solutions for African American students include pedagogical practices that recognize students’ socio-cultural identity as a vital element in the learning process. It is the case, however, that the genuine infusion of African American students’ culture is not evident in all classrooms, or in all disciplines. While the causes are many—and undoubtedly complex—many educators’ misunderstanding of how to effectively utilize student identity to the benefit of student learning constitute a large part of the problem. Furthermore, science, traditionally characterized as neutral and void of cultural influence, is an even more difficult subject for teachers merge with students’ home lives and their communities. This study argues that one formidable remedy can be found in providing more literature and references for pedagogical practices centered on African American students’ social, cultural and political identities as an oppressed group in society. This presentation will be of a proposed study that will utilize the qualitative case study methodology to describe the ways in which the African-centered curriculum, as informed by the Afrocentric educational philosophy, is translated into practice by teachers during science instruction in an African-centered school.