Abstract Title

Maximizing 340B Income to Improve Patient Outcomes

Abstract

People living with HIV, specifically those residing in rural areas, face numerous barriers that make it difficult for them to access and remain retained in care. Retaining clients in care and adherent to their medication are key components in improving health outcomes for both people living with HIV and preventing the spread of HIV within communities. Some identified barriers to care for people living with HIV include stigma, lack of financial resources, transportation issues, food insecurities, unstable housing, employment issues, provider discrimination/ stigma, no insurance/ underinsured, mental health/ substance abuse, and having to travel long distances to clinics.

Grant funding allows Ryan White Programs to provide life saving care to people living with HIV through the delivery of medical services and access to medication. In addition to receiving grant funding, Ryan White Programs are also eligible to participate in HRSA’s 340B Program which allows them to increase programmatic income and expand services and provide additional resources to people living with HIV. Addressing barriers to care is crucial in keeping clients engaged in care and achieving/ sustaining viral suppression as well as eliminating the spread of HIV. It stands to reason that people facing multiple barriers to care will not be as easily retained in care, adherent to their medication, and virally suppressed which is why addressing barriers to care are monumental.

By leveraging grant funding in conjunction with programmatic income, this Ryan White Clinic has been able to provide an abundance of resources and develop new programs to expand services for people living with HIV in rural Georgia. Some of the ways the program focuses on addressing barriers to care are by providing transportation resources, a nutrition program, emergency financial assistance, services at satellite clinics, medication assistance, patient engagement activities, and telehealth services.

Keywords

340B, Funding, HIV/AIDS, Barriers, Viral Suppression

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Maximizing 340B Income to Improve Patient Outcomes

People living with HIV, specifically those residing in rural areas, face numerous barriers that make it difficult for them to access and remain retained in care. Retaining clients in care and adherent to their medication are key components in improving health outcomes for both people living with HIV and preventing the spread of HIV within communities. Some identified barriers to care for people living with HIV include stigma, lack of financial resources, transportation issues, food insecurities, unstable housing, employment issues, provider discrimination/ stigma, no insurance/ underinsured, mental health/ substance abuse, and having to travel long distances to clinics.

Grant funding allows Ryan White Programs to provide life saving care to people living with HIV through the delivery of medical services and access to medication. In addition to receiving grant funding, Ryan White Programs are also eligible to participate in HRSA’s 340B Program which allows them to increase programmatic income and expand services and provide additional resources to people living with HIV. Addressing barriers to care is crucial in keeping clients engaged in care and achieving/ sustaining viral suppression as well as eliminating the spread of HIV. It stands to reason that people facing multiple barriers to care will not be as easily retained in care, adherent to their medication, and virally suppressed which is why addressing barriers to care are monumental.

By leveraging grant funding in conjunction with programmatic income, this Ryan White Clinic has been able to provide an abundance of resources and develop new programs to expand services for people living with HIV in rural Georgia. Some of the ways the program focuses on addressing barriers to care are by providing transportation resources, a nutrition program, emergency financial assistance, services at satellite clinics, medication assistance, patient engagement activities, and telehealth services.