Highest Degree of Primary Presenter

Master's Degree

Presentation Abstract

Researchers have emphasized the importance of teacher-student relationships (TSRs), showing that the quality of these relationships can have significant, short and long-term effects on student outcomes and school climate (Baker, Grant & Morlock, 2008; Guess & Bowling, 2013; Hamre & Pianta, 2001). While School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (SW-PBIS) also has positive effects on school climate (Bradshaw, Waasdorp & Leaf, 2015), little research has been done to examine how SW-PBIS and TSRs intersect to influence student outcomes and school climate. This presentation will address the integration of these two factors as perceived by practitioners responsible for implementing SW-PBIS.

Data will be presented from focus group interviews with SW-PBS teams and mental health professionals (N = 178) from three high-need, low-resource school districts in Georgia. Interviews were conducted to understand how participants perceived barriers and facilitators to SW-PBIS. Of specific interest were SW-PBIS team members’ views about how TSRs influence the implementation and efficacy of SW-PBIS, as well as how SW-PBIS implementation influences TSR quality and school climate.

Results indicated that TSRs support positive student behavior in a preventative way that is consistent with the goals of SW-PBIS, while the rituals and routines of SW-PBIS also provide opportunities for positive interactions between teachers and students that enhance positive TSRs. Results also provided some evidence that poor TSRs may work against SW-PBIS goals by contributing to an increase in negative student behaviors. Presenters will discuss the implications of this bidirectional relationship for school professionals who want to improve SW-PBIS implementation and/or TSR quality.

Implications from results are especially important for schools that serve diverse communities. Our results described how TSRs can be particularly important for the success of SW-PBIS in light of socioeconomic or racial/ethnic diversity within the student body, as it builds perceived trust between teachers, students and families.

Share

COinS
 

Teacher-Student Relationships: Strengthening the Impact of PBIS on Climate

Researchers have emphasized the importance of teacher-student relationships (TSRs), showing that the quality of these relationships can have significant, short and long-term effects on student outcomes and school climate (Baker, Grant & Morlock, 2008; Guess & Bowling, 2013; Hamre & Pianta, 2001). While School-Wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (SW-PBIS) also has positive effects on school climate (Bradshaw, Waasdorp & Leaf, 2015), little research has been done to examine how SW-PBIS and TSRs intersect to influence student outcomes and school climate. This presentation will address the integration of these two factors as perceived by practitioners responsible for implementing SW-PBIS.

Data will be presented from focus group interviews with SW-PBS teams and mental health professionals (N = 178) from three high-need, low-resource school districts in Georgia. Interviews were conducted to understand how participants perceived barriers and facilitators to SW-PBIS. Of specific interest were SW-PBIS team members’ views about how TSRs influence the implementation and efficacy of SW-PBIS, as well as how SW-PBIS implementation influences TSR quality and school climate.

Results indicated that TSRs support positive student behavior in a preventative way that is consistent with the goals of SW-PBIS, while the rituals and routines of SW-PBIS also provide opportunities for positive interactions between teachers and students that enhance positive TSRs. Results also provided some evidence that poor TSRs may work against SW-PBIS goals by contributing to an increase in negative student behaviors. Presenters will discuss the implications of this bidirectional relationship for school professionals who want to improve SW-PBIS implementation and/or TSR quality.

Implications from results are especially important for schools that serve diverse communities. Our results described how TSRs can be particularly important for the success of SW-PBIS in light of socioeconomic or racial/ethnic diversity within the student body, as it builds perceived trust between teachers, students and families.