Presentation Title

Developmental Delays and Problem Behavior Associated with Electronics

Highest Degree of Primary Presenter

Doctorate Degree

Presentation Abstract

Educators and clinicians working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and related disorders are frequently familiar with the impact that electronics (e.g., tablets, computers, and video games) can have on this population. When used properly, these devices can be adventitious to the educator and clinician through use as reinforcement. However, these devices can also be problematic when removal or restriction serves as a common antecedent for problem behavior. The purpose of this talk is to discuss the impact of electronics on problem exhibited by individuals with ASD and related disabilities and how this relates to an educational context. First, we review qualitative report from caregiver’s of children with ASD who engage in problem behavior to identify themes related to electronics. Second, we review systematic preference assessment data from several clients enrolled in a treatment center for problem behavior to objectively identify how frequently electronics are in the top preferred items for this population. Third, we discuss methods for using electronics to promote compliance in individuals with severe problem behavior in demand contexts, highlighting a single-case study where this methodology was required to promote independent completion of academic work. Last, we present research, highlighting a case example, of a common treatment strategy used when problem behavior occurring when electronics are removed is too severe for educators to safely manage.

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Developmental Delays and Problem Behavior Associated with Electronics

Educators and clinicians working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and related disorders are frequently familiar with the impact that electronics (e.g., tablets, computers, and video games) can have on this population. When used properly, these devices can be adventitious to the educator and clinician through use as reinforcement. However, these devices can also be problematic when removal or restriction serves as a common antecedent for problem behavior. The purpose of this talk is to discuss the impact of electronics on problem exhibited by individuals with ASD and related disabilities and how this relates to an educational context. First, we review qualitative report from caregiver’s of children with ASD who engage in problem behavior to identify themes related to electronics. Second, we review systematic preference assessment data from several clients enrolled in a treatment center for problem behavior to objectively identify how frequently electronics are in the top preferred items for this population. Third, we discuss methods for using electronics to promote compliance in individuals with severe problem behavior in demand contexts, highlighting a single-case study where this methodology was required to promote independent completion of academic work. Last, we present research, highlighting a case example, of a common treatment strategy used when problem behavior occurring when electronics are removed is too severe for educators to safely manage.