Presentation Title

Animating the library’s value: Developing an information literacy cartoon

Presenter Information

Karen BronshteynFollow

Location

PARB 227

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Other

It works well for both audiences: K-12 and Higher Education

Abstract

An academic library was asked to create a brief, compelling, attention-grabbing marketing tool that convinces students to choose library resources over Google. After numerous discussions and a brief student survey, the format of the marketing tool was selected, an animated video, and a ballpark cost was obtained.

Year-end funds were allocated for an animated video to be dubbed “Hunt Library vs. Google”. Followed by an abbreviated vendor selection and an arduous down-payment process, collaborative work began. We provided an example video that we wished to emulate. The video showed a student in a boat fishing (narrated as “drowning”) in a sea of information. We wanted to change the boating concept into a flying concept, yet provided little input on how to accomplish this. The animators needed much more guidance, and the fiscal year clock was ticking on our creative endeavor.

They were used to serving businesses with a more tangible product. So we took several steps back to educate them on our product, (which is quality information and service,) and our “company,” an aeronautical university library.

The librarians did not have experience in this type of creative process. After brainstorming, we provided a few ideas on how flight could enter the new concept, and the animator became intrigued with using birds to express a few points.

This presentation will describe several practical considerations, such as costs; types of animation; the creative process (including script, storyboarding, artwork, and voice selection); focus group responses; revisions; release; usage; and ongoing promotion.

Presentation Description

An academic library serving both an online and a residential campus is asked to create a brief, compelling, attention-grabbing marketing tool that convinces students to choose library resources over Google. The result is a one minute, 49 second cartoon that becomes adopted by numerous online instructors and integrated into the residential first year experience course.

Session Goals

To provide an overview of the development of a potential marketing tool for information literacy.

Session Objectives

To acclimate librarians to an animated marketing possibility.

To prompt librarians to think about more accessible ways to express the library's value.

To mention glitches that may arise in embarking on a creative project, in the hopes of saving others time.

Keywords

animated video, information literacy cartoon, library marketing tool

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Feb 22nd, 10:15 AM Feb 22nd, 11:30 AM

Animating the library’s value: Developing an information literacy cartoon

PARB 227

An academic library was asked to create a brief, compelling, attention-grabbing marketing tool that convinces students to choose library resources over Google. After numerous discussions and a brief student survey, the format of the marketing tool was selected, an animated video, and a ballpark cost was obtained.

Year-end funds were allocated for an animated video to be dubbed “Hunt Library vs. Google”. Followed by an abbreviated vendor selection and an arduous down-payment process, collaborative work began. We provided an example video that we wished to emulate. The video showed a student in a boat fishing (narrated as “drowning”) in a sea of information. We wanted to change the boating concept into a flying concept, yet provided little input on how to accomplish this. The animators needed much more guidance, and the fiscal year clock was ticking on our creative endeavor.

They were used to serving businesses with a more tangible product. So we took several steps back to educate them on our product, (which is quality information and service,) and our “company,” an aeronautical university library.

The librarians did not have experience in this type of creative process. After brainstorming, we provided a few ideas on how flight could enter the new concept, and the animator became intrigued with using birds to express a few points.

This presentation will describe several practical considerations, such as costs; types of animation; the creative process (including script, storyboarding, artwork, and voice selection); focus group responses; revisions; release; usage; and ongoing promotion.