Presentation Title

Engaging in undergraduate research: Can librarians play a more significant role?

Location

PARB 128

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

This presentation will describe the importance of undergraduate research and the implications it holds for pursuing an advanced degree. Increasingly, universities are prioritizing undergraduate research, in some cases dedicating entire offices to its advancement. As librarians, we are in a unique position to offer support to these offices in a variety of ways. One of these ways is in willing to serve as research mentors. Thus, this presentation will highlight how library-sponsored research allows students to engage in a high-impact educational practice and with the Association of College & Research Libraries' Information Literacy Framework. In discussing these topics, the presentation will highlight the unique experiences of minority and underrepresented students in the humanities and the various barriers they may face in preparation for graduate school. I propose that librarians can help alleviate these barriers by offering mentorship and a more personalized introduction to research. Additionally, librarians may be better able than their instructor counterparts to allow students to explore research topics where they draw on their experiences and funds of knowledge — thus furthering the students' ability to conduct research, increasing their confidence in entering traditionally white academic spaces, and preparing them to be successful in graduate school.

Presentation Description

This presentation will focus on librarian-sponsored undergraduate research and the ways in which librarians can positively impact overall student success and information literacy of participating students. Through working closely with librarians, students will become more familiar with the services that the library provides and the work that their librarians do. Though the general goal of librarian-sponsored research is to prepare students for graduate school, we may also use this as an opportunity to introduce students to librarianship and various research topics within the field.

Session Goals

  • librarians will seek to create partnerships with undergraduate research offices
  • librarians will discuss the funds of knowledge with their university's teaching and learning center
  • librarians will take on summer research interns

Session Objectives

  • Attendees will develop a deeper understanding of undergraduate research opportunities
  • Attendees will be able to communicate effectively the role librarians can take in mentoring undergraduates
  • Attendees will gain a keen understanding of the funds of knowledge
  • Attendees will gain a deeper appreciation of the importance of mentoring underrepresented students

Keywords

mentorship, undergraduate research, minority-serving institutions, funds of knowledge, underrepresented students

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Feb 21st, 3:15 PM Feb 21st, 4:30 PM

Engaging in undergraduate research: Can librarians play a more significant role?

PARB 128

This presentation will describe the importance of undergraduate research and the implications it holds for pursuing an advanced degree. Increasingly, universities are prioritizing undergraduate research, in some cases dedicating entire offices to its advancement. As librarians, we are in a unique position to offer support to these offices in a variety of ways. One of these ways is in willing to serve as research mentors. Thus, this presentation will highlight how library-sponsored research allows students to engage in a high-impact educational practice and with the Association of College & Research Libraries' Information Literacy Framework. In discussing these topics, the presentation will highlight the unique experiences of minority and underrepresented students in the humanities and the various barriers they may face in preparation for graduate school. I propose that librarians can help alleviate these barriers by offering mentorship and a more personalized introduction to research. Additionally, librarians may be better able than their instructor counterparts to allow students to explore research topics where they draw on their experiences and funds of knowledge — thus furthering the students' ability to conduct research, increasing their confidence in entering traditionally white academic spaces, and preparing them to be successful in graduate school.