Presentation Title

The Essential Role of College and University Librarians in Supporting Transfer Student Success

Location

ELAB 21

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Nationwide, the numbers of transfer students on college and university campuses are increasing; however, libraries have not fully recognized the unique needs of transfer students with respect to students' attainment of information literacy competencies. Students may come to our campus with no previous information literacy instruction, and even if they had a "library instruction" class, it does not mean they can apply that to a new institution with different and perhaps more complex resources, or they may be taking online classes. Neither can we treat transfer students as "First Time in College" students, because they are not. Transfer students frequently experience "transfer shock", which is defined as a drop in GPA post-transfer. Since information literacy is multi-disciplinary and essential to finding, applying and ethically using information, there is definitely a role for libraries to support the academic success of transfer students. By supporting transfer students we also support institutional initiatives often tied to performance-based funding. We will explore transfer student pathways beyond the traditional community-college-to-university path, challenges inherent in the transfer process and how libraries and librarians can support the academic success of this incredibly diverse group of students.

The presenters are academic librarians; one at a large university and at one of the university's large feeder colleges, and bring both personal observations as well as significant research to inform attendees.

Presentation Description

We will explore transfer student pathways including vertical, reverse, transient, double dipping and swirling pathways, and the transfer experience. A discussion of "transfer shock" and how librarians have a role in mitigating that by ensuring students are prepared for upper-division research assignments, and how library support of transfer students can also support institutional initiatives such as graduation timelines.

Session Goals

1. Heighten awareness of the many transfer student pathways, and implications for libraries/librarians

2. Increase understanding of the transfer student experience, and implications for libraries/librarians as well as for our institutions

3. Discuss "transfer shock" and implications for libraries/librarians

4. Encourage attendees to work collaboratively to support the information literacy needs of this diverse population

Session Objectives

  • To increase awareness of the challenges transfer students face as well as the diversity of this student population, and
  • To motivate librarians to consider the information literacy needs of transfer students by developing instruction and outreach specific to the needs of transfer students;\
  • To accomplish this through collaboration with other institutional stakeholders, including student affairs and relationships between librarians at universities and recognized feeder colleges

Keywords

transfer students, "transfer shock", information literacy, community colleges, universities, academic librarians, academic libraries, diverse populations, adult learners

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Feb 21st, 8:30 AM Feb 21st, 9:45 AM

The Essential Role of College and University Librarians in Supporting Transfer Student Success

ELAB 21

Nationwide, the numbers of transfer students on college and university campuses are increasing; however, libraries have not fully recognized the unique needs of transfer students with respect to students' attainment of information literacy competencies. Students may come to our campus with no previous information literacy instruction, and even if they had a "library instruction" class, it does not mean they can apply that to a new institution with different and perhaps more complex resources, or they may be taking online classes. Neither can we treat transfer students as "First Time in College" students, because they are not. Transfer students frequently experience "transfer shock", which is defined as a drop in GPA post-transfer. Since information literacy is multi-disciplinary and essential to finding, applying and ethically using information, there is definitely a role for libraries to support the academic success of transfer students. By supporting transfer students we also support institutional initiatives often tied to performance-based funding. We will explore transfer student pathways beyond the traditional community-college-to-university path, challenges inherent in the transfer process and how libraries and librarians can support the academic success of this incredibly diverse group of students.

The presenters are academic librarians; one at a large university and at one of the university's large feeder colleges, and bring both personal observations as well as significant research to inform attendees.